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Help with script (rm command)

Posted on 2007-04-01
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
The following script will remove log files that were last modified yesterday:

DATE=`TZ=GMT+24 date`
DATE="`echo ${DATE} | awk '{print $2}'` `echo ${DATE} | awk '{print $3}'`"
rm `ls -ltr ${LOG_PATH}/*.log | grep "${DATE}" |  awk '{print $9}'`

That works fine if there are indeed files modified yesterday that can be deleted. If there are no files to be deleted, the rm command will show the usage statement. How can I add the check before applying the rm command? Thanks.
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Question by:integrosys
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7 Comments
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 18834654
touch -t`TZ=GMT+24 date +%Y%m%d`0000 yesterday
touch -t`TZ=GMT+00 date +%Y%m%d`0000 today
find  . -newer yesterday \! -newer today -exec rm {} \;
0
 

Author Comment

by:integrosys
ID: 18834663
I don't really understand your solution. Is it possible to modify my script a bit to get what I want instead of giving me a totally new solution? Thanks.
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LVL 84

Accepted Solution

by:
ozo earned 20 total points
ID: 18834681
rm `ls -ltr ${LOG_PATH}/*.log | grep "${DATE}" |  awk '{print $9}'` 2> /dev/null
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Author Comment

by:integrosys
ID: 18834698
Hi,

That looks fine. But suppose that there are indeed files to delete, but somehow the rm command failed (maybe due to file permission), how would I be able to catch this condition and return an error code from the script? In short, this is what I want:

if (there are files to delete) {
  rm files
  if (rm command failed) {
    exit 1
  }
}
exit 0
0
 
LVL 7

Assisted Solution

by:nixfreak
nixfreak earned 20 total points
ID: 18838592
Replace the below line:
rm `ls -ltr ${LOG_PATH}/*.log | grep "${DATE}" |  awk '{print $9}'`

with:
FILES=`ls -ltr ${LOG_PATH}/*.log | grep "${DATE}" |  awk '{print $9}'`
[ -z "$FILES" ] && exit 1
rm $FILES
0
 
LVL 48

Assisted Solution

by:Tintin
Tintin earned 20 total points
ID: 18839800
Just use the

rm -f ......

to stop rm displaying a usage message if no files exist.
0
 

Author Comment

by:integrosys
ID: 18841587
Thanks. All your solutions are useful to me.
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