startup and nightly scripts

Hi.
I'm using Solaris 10, and having trouble finding out how to start something after boot the correct way.
As root I need to run /opt/glassfish/bin/asadmin start-appserv after reboot.
Any ideas how I can do this.

I allso need to do /opt/glassfish/bin/asadmin restart-appserv every night. Anyone who knows how?
kristian_grAsked:
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vamsi_ukCommented:
to schedule a job everynight you need to use cron jobs. please refer to the following link for good explanation on how to setup cron job.

http://adminschoice.com/docs/crontab.htm

If you need to start your application at boot time you need to put a startup script at run level scripts which are also known as rc scripts.

Here is how you can add the script to run at boot time,

to start a script at run level 2...

1. Become Superuser

2. Add the script to the /etc/init.d directory
# cp <filename>  /etc/init.d
# chmod 0744 /etc/init.d/<filename>
# chown root:sys /etc/init.d/<filename>

3. Create links to the appropriate rc<n>.d   where n is the number of the level
# cd /etc/init.d
# ln <filename> /etc/rc2.d/S<filename>
# ln <filename> /etc/rc<n>.d/K<filename>   <-- this is your kill script while system is shutdown

4. Use the ls cocmmand to verify that the script has links in the specified directories
# ls -l /etc/init.d/  /etc/rc2.d  /etc/rc<n>.d
thats it.. Whenever you are booting the system the script will run when the Operating system enters in run level 2.
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Brian UtterbackPrinciple Software EngineerCommented:
Actually, for Solaris 10 and above, the proper way to start services at boot time is to use SMF. Although the startup scripts in the rc?.d directories are still run, this is called "legacy support" and
are deprecated.

SMF is a little trickier to get up to speed, but they offer quite a few advantages, including automatic restart of a service if the daemon crashes.

I notice you are using glassfish. Glassfish comes with SMF support built in. I am not an expert on Glassfish, but my understanding is that you can use the asadmin command to create the SMF service. After that all you have to do is enable it.

I did come across this URL that talks about it. I cannot guarantee that this still works exactly as described, since the article is a year old. However, it should have something about this in the Glassfish documentation.

http://blogs.sun.com/bloggerkedar/entry/app_server_and_solaris_10
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