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Many newly installed programs don't run and have no shortcut placed in any menus

Posted on 2007-04-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I've installed 3 different distributions on 3 different pentium-3 PCs. Debian, Mandriva free2007, PCLinux.

Using the built in program/package downloading software, I have been able to easily download and install many different programs and dependencies. However in my experience, only about 60% of these new programs appear in the menus and only around 60% work.

Why aren't they automatically placed in the menus?

Why do so many programs not run and not give any feedback on the screen?

I need to search for the programs and when I find them I try to run the most obvious program.
And when I run the program the result is ......... nothing!

Grateful for any comments or advice
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Question by:Alistair7
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by:mostenscer
mostenscer earned 100 total points
ID: 18854102
well all programs dont need (some times can't  have)shortcuts(based on thinking of writers of those programs:)). So programmers/designer dont add code for that functionality. Most linux software works btw. installation of software on linux is getting more and more trivial every day but its not quite there yet.
you can always make your own shortcuts on menues or ne where else you want to. now program is a v general word now a days.
i hope this helps. try ubunto and fedora as well if you have time. This question was too general so i couldnt do a good justice. let me know if you have ne specific questions
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cheesygit182 earned 400 total points
ID: 18861617
Most linux programs are designed to be run from the linux terminal, and will probably work fine(or at least give you feedback) if run from the terminal.
All the "shortcuts" do is run the program from the terminal, without actually showing you the terminal...
Therefore, if a program (like mplayer) works entirely from the terminal, it doesn't need to draw a window and have a GUI, just text, and written commands. SO if you made a "shortcut" for it, the program would run perfectly, but nothing would be displayed on the screen...

Think of a program that when you run it, nothing happens. Browse to the folder where that executable program is(in Konqueror, the KDE file manager), and press F4. In the Konsole window that pops up, type "./*****" where "*****" is the file name of the executable. Press enter. See what feedback you get?
Please tell me how you got on, or if this made no sense at all! :p

~cheesygit182
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