naming convention for web sub-domain name A record

My domain name mycompany5.net and primary company web page www.mycompany5.net are currently hosted remotely. I would like to create a sub-domain that would point to my local SBS company server. My domain host supports the creation of sub-domains as part of my service agreement and will also configure the A record free of charge. I have a static ip here at the office.

What is the naming convention for the DNS name in this case?
Would I call it home.mycompany5.net or local.mycompany5.net or something like this?

Here is my last question along this line.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/System_Utilities/Remote_Access/VPN/Q_22487974.html

thx.
ArkAdminAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
brasslanCommented:
I don't know if there is a 'naming convention' in this case.  You can have any A record created to point to any IP address that you choose.  Looking at your last question, you wanted to create an A record that could be used by remote vpn clients so they would not have to remember the IP address.  This is the main point of DNS, as it is easier to remember a name than a IP address.  You can create as many A records as you like and have them all point to your single static IP address.  vpn.mycompany5.net, home.mycompany5.net etc.  There are no rules saying that you must use these names, so you can pick whatever you like.  Then when the rest of the world uses that name 'vpn.mycompany5.net' then it will resolve to your static IP address connecting them with your vpn concentrator.

From the dos prompt you can ping www.mycompany5.net and you will see the IP address of the web server that your web page is hosted at.  That is the IP address that the A record points to.  This IP address does not have to point to an address that belongs to your hosting company.  The DNS record can point to any IP address that you choose, an address that belongs to your ISP, or an internal address on your network.  For example....  brad.cisco.com resolves to 10.94.146.121   Because this A record points to a 10.x.x.x private IP address, then this particular A record isn't any good for anyone outside of the cisco.com network.  But it probably helps Brad, or other people inside of the cisco.com network access a server that they don't want to remember the IP address for.

Ok, I'll get off my soap box now.  I hope some of this helps to answer your question.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.