Project Images Best Practices

Greetings experts,

I have a quick "Best Practices" type question that I hope will be an easy one to answer.  

I have a VS 2005 Windows Application that will have anywhere from 80-100 icon type images.  The average file size of these images is 1KB-3KB.   I dragged them into the project resources page and they all work fine.   However, I'm concerned as to whether or not this approach will be adding too much memory overhead.  

So my question is . . .  Given the number of images in my scenario, what is the most effecient way to make the images available to my application?  

Thank you in advance,

Keith
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kdwoodAsked:
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VBRocksCommented:
When you add resources to your application, they are linked by default, so no need to worry about them all being loaded into memory at once.  Here is some additional information about project resources:

Note:  For VS2005, try the following help file link:
ms-help://MS.VSCC.v80/MS.MSDN.v80/MS.VisualStudio.v80.en/dv_vsprojopt/html/81ef0706-f495-4613-8634-f4a3a5d681b9.htm

Resources:
Items that you add to the project using the Resource Designer are placed in the Resources directory for your project. The designer information is stored in Resources.resx, and code for the resource is stored in Resources.Designer.vb

For Visual Basic, the Resource Designer generates strongly-typed resources into the My.Resources namespace.

Strongly-typed resources encapsulate access to resources by creating classes that contain a set of static, read-only (get) properties at compile time. You can consume resources using the "get" properties rather than using the GetString and GetObject methods of the ResourceManager class.

Resources also have a Persistence property that specifies whether they are linked or embedded. Linked resources are stored as files within the project; the .resx file stores a relative path to the file, and during compilation, the resource data is placed into the manifest for the application.

Linked resources are stored as files within the project; during compilation the resource data is taken from the files and placed into the manifest for the application. The application's resource file (.resx) stores only a relative path or link to the file on disk.

By default, all new resources are linked resources, as opposed to embedded.

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kdwoodAuthor Commented:
VBRocks,

Makes perfect sense.  I appreciate the clear explanation.

Thank you for your quick response,

Regards,

Keith
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