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Q about Accessibility

Hello,

perhaps a dumb questioni but I am curious as to why I am not getting a "Inconsistent Accessibility" error or at least a warning.  For example, if I had a class like the following:

internal class Person
{
    //properties
    public string FirstName
   {
         get { ............. }
         set { ............ }
   }
}

My property has a greater accessibility level than my class declaration.  I am surprised that it compiles w/o an error or warning.

thanks
0
brdrok
Asked:
brdrok
  • 2
2 Solutions
 
NicoCommented:
Internal means that the class is public within the assembly that it is declared in. So I suppose that means that a public property of an internal class is public for only this assembly too.

on http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wxh6fsc7.aspx you can find more info.
0
 
NicoCommented:
Also it might be helpful to read chapter 3.5 of the C# language specification, which describes exactly how this stuff works :)
0
 
dstanley9Commented:
That is correct.  Public properties of an internal class will be available to all classes within that assembly.  Private methods of an internal class are still only available to that class.  Proetected methods of an internal class are available to inherited classes within that assembly (since it's internal you can't inherit from it in another assembly).

So there's nothing "inconsistent" about defining a public property on an internal class - it will still only be available within the assembly.
0
 
brdrokAuthor Commented:
thanks for the comments.  I was thinking it's odd that public properties is legal even though the class has been declared as internal.  But it has to be that way if for no other reason that should an internal class implement some kind of interface it wouldn't be able to if an internal class couldn't expose any public members, methods, etc.
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