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Moving DNS server

Posted on 2007-04-05
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
I have a internal DNS server that is running Win 2K and I need to remove that server.  It's getting old  and outdated.  It is a backup DC and is also the primary DNS for the office.  I would like to move it to another one of the servers that i have as a backup (secondary) DNS server but not sure if this is the best way.  Any help is appreciated.  thanks.

Perry
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Question by:prutter
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by:KCTS
ID: 18861601
Is there any reason that you are not using Active Directory Integrated DNS?

If I were you I would install Active Directory Integrated DNS on the first Domain Controller and then promote one of the other servers also to be a Domain Controller (note with Win2k there is no such thing as a PDC and BDC - all servers are updateable though the first doman controller to be created holds what are referred to as FSMO roles - one of which is the PDC Emulator)

How many Domain Controllers have you got.? If you only have one I would recommend installing a second.  so that you have full redundancy. Active Directory Integrated DNS is far more efficient you wold have to sacrifice this to have DNS on a different server and with no obvious benefits or fault tollerance. DHCP uses minimal resources so again not much benedit to be gained. A second domain controller which duplacates Acive Directory, DNS and DHCP services would be more beneficial providing load balancing and redundancy
 
The procees is fairly straight forward

From the command line promote a member server promote the  machine to a domain controller with the DCPROMO command from the command line
Select ‘Additional Domain Controller in an existing Domain’

Once Active Directory is installed then to make the new machine a global catalog server, go to Administrative Tools, Active Directory Sites and Services, Expand ,Sites, Default first site and Servers. Right click on the new server and select properties and tick the ‘Global Catalog’ checkbox. (Global catalog is essential for logon as it needs to be queried to establish Universal Group Membership)

Assuming that you were using Active Directory Integrated DNS on the first Domain Controller, DNS will have replicated to the new domain controller along with Active Directory.

If you are using DHCP you should spread this across the domain controllers, In a simple single domain this is easiest done by Setting up DHCP on the second Domain controller and using a scope on the same network that does not overlap with the existing scope on the other Domain Controller. Don’t forget to set the default gateway (router) and DNS Servers. Talking of which all the clients (and the domain controllers themselves) need to have their Preferred DNS server set to one domain controller, and the Alternate DNS to the other, that way if one of the DNS Servers fails, the clients will automatically use the other,

Both Domain Controllers by this point will have Active Directory, Global Catalog, DNS and DHCP. and the domain could function for a while at least should any one of them fail. However for a fully robust system you need to be aware that the first domain controller that existed will by default hold what are called FSMO Roles. There are five of these roles that are held on a single server and are essential for the functioning of the network. If the second Domain Controller fails, then no problem as the FSMO roles are on the first Domain Controller. However if you intent to function with the second Domain Controller only, then the roles need to be moved to the Second Domain Controller. Ideally if this is a planned event you should cleanly transfer the FSMO roles, if it is an unplanned ‘emergency’ the FSMO roles can be seized (see http://support.microsoft.com/kb/255504)
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by:prutter
ID: 18864793
i wasn't aware that there were 2 kinds of DNS servers.  I only assume that I am running the AD version becasue when I set this up years ago i installed it on the DC.  This was done when the network was all Win2K and has two DC's.  I now have primarily a Win2K3 netwrok (but have a couple Win2K servers) and I want to move totally towards setting everything up on them.  I currently have DNS on two servers (1 DC and 1 non-DC).  I also have DHCP on a server that is not a DC.  Right now I have 3 DC's (2 Win2K3 and 1 Win2K).  the 2 Win2K3 servers are set as Global Catalogs adn the other is NOT.  Currently I have DNS (not sure what flavor) setup on 2 servers (the old Win2K server that is a DC and a Win2K3 server that is not a DC).  My objective is to take all the services away from that machine (Win2K DC)  and kill it but need to transfer that stuff to another server.  Currenetly everyone is pointed to teh old server as their first DNS server.  Any thoouhgt I would appreciate.. Thanks.

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KCTS earned 125 total points
ID: 18868950
This is how I would go about it.

Install Windows 2003 on the new hardware
Assign the new computer an IP address and subnet mask on the existing network
Make sure that the preferred DNS server on new machine points to the existing DNS Server on the Domain (normally the existing domain controller)

Join the new machine to the existing domain as a member server

Note: If the new Windows 2003 server is the ‘R2’ version and the existing set-up is not then you need to run Adprep  from CD2 of the R2 disks on the existing Domain controller. Adprep is in the \CMPNENTS\R2\ folder on CD2.

From the command line promote the new machine to a domain controller with the DCPROMO command from the command line
Select ‘Additional Domain Controller in an existing Domain’

Once Active Directory is installed then to make the new machine a global catalog server, go to Administrative Tools, Active Directory Sites and Services, Expand ,Sites, Default first site and Servers. Right click on the new server and select properties and tick the ‘Global Catalog’ checkbox. (Global catalog is essential for logon as it needs to be queried to establish Universal Group Membership)

Assuming that you were using Active Directory Integrated DNS on the first Domain Controller, DNS will have replicated to the new domain controller along with Active Directory.

as DHCP is on another server you won't need to duplicate this BUT Don’t forget to set the default gateway (router) and DNS Server options.

For now, all the clients (and the domain controllers themselves) need to have their Preferred DNS server set to one domain controller (the new one), and the Alternate DNS to the other (the old one), that way if one of the DNS Servers fails, the clients will automatically use the other.

Both Domain Controllers by this point will have Active Directory, Global Catalog, DNS and DHCP.
You now need to move the FSMO roles (including the PDC emulator from the old machine to the new machine.  You should cleanly transfer the FSMO roles. This can be done in different ways see http://support.microsoft.com/kb/255504 or http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324801 or http://www.petri.co.il/transferring_fsmo_roles.htm for alternatives methods that can be used.

You should now test that all is OK by disconnecting the old DC (just unplug the network cable). The domain should continue to function, if not then troubleshoot. Reconnect the old Domain Controller when you are satisfied all is OK.

Once you are sure that all is OK then you can either leave both Domain controllers operational, (two domain controllers are normally recommended for fault tolerance)

If you really want to get rid of the old Domain controller then:

You should make sure that all the clients are using the new Domain Controller as their preferred DNS Server - and the Alternate DNS server is blank. (manual or DHCP options)

Run DCPROMO on the old DC to demote it back to a member server, and then remove it from the domain.
Reconfigure the DHCP scope if required.
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