Connecting Wireless 4-Port Router to 4-Port Router Modem via LAN ports

I have desktop and notebook (with wireless) running Win XP Pro
I have a 4 port Modem/router which connects by LAN1 (so it has 3 unused ports) to my desktop  (Belkin F1P1241)
I have a 4 port/Wireless router ( Belkin F5D7230-4)

I know that I can connect the LAN1 of the Modem/router to the input of wireless router and then its LAN1 to the Desktop and this should work

My question is: Is it feasible to use the one of the unused LAN ports (say LAN2) of the Modem/router conected to one of the LAN ports (say LAN2) of the Wireless modem
What sort of setup procedure would I need
Specifically
How do I set up the IP addresses
Do I need a bridge between the connection LAN1 to desktop) and LAN2 to teh wireless/router?
Your thoughts much appreciated

 
 
dbrucesteerAsked:
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timeshellCommented:
A cross over cable between the two LAN ports should be all that you need.  Just plug it in.

The IP configuration would be per the set up instructions of your wireless router and/or modem/router.
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dbrucesteerAuthor Commented:
Thanks 'Timeshell' my real question is I think as follows

If we define a 4-port router as having an input and 4 outputs (bearing in mind that the inputs and outputs are bidirectional). Then my qustion can be restated as
Can the router be set up so that two outputs (of two different routers) are connected together?

I used the X-over cable but could only talk to one router (the one the desktop is connected to) and not the other.
Let us assume that the DHCP of the modem-router is enabled but disabled in the wireless router. Will the modem router be able to 'see' the wireless section of the wireless modem?
I theoretical problem because the standard way of coneection works well.

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timeshellCommented:
Let us redefine your ports.

What you call "Input" is called the WAN port.
What you call "Output" are the LAN ports.

The LAN ports are configured as a switch on both the modem/router and the wireless router.

Connecting the LAN to LAN on the modem/router to wireless router should allow any device on the wireless router to communicate with the modem/router.

First question I have for you now is, when you connect the two routers together with the X-over, do you have link lights light up on the LAN port on both devices.  If not, you may try to use a straight cable.  If that doesn't work, you may have a bad cable, so try others.  If that doesn't work, it's possible you have faulty hardware.

It's also possible that your routers also have firmware configuration in them that prevent certain communications.  For example, the wireless router may have a setting in it preventing devices on the switch from talking to each other and only communicate with the its WAN port.  This setting exists on some wireless routers and can usually be disabled.   So, that's something else I'd suggest you check for if the link lights appear to show a connection between the two.
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dbrucesteerAuthor Commented:
Thanks for setting me straight on 'WANS'
LAN lights are lit with the X-Over cable
Currently the Modem/router has DHCP enables wirhin the range of 10.1.1.1 and
the Wireless/router has DHCP within the range 192.168.2.1

I have just realized what I should be doing is the following

Modem/router
LAN1 connected to Destop
LAN2 connected to WAN of wireless/router  only wireless coneection required for the notebook
I will try this and get back to you



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timeshellCommented:
You need to disable the DHCP on the wireless router.  It will assign an address that will not be compatible the address ranges assigned by your modem.

If you are not able to get an IP address assignment from your modem, via the switch, there is another configuration that you can try.


These would be the steps
1.  Plug cable between WAN port on wireless/router to LAN port on modem/router.
2.  In the settings on the wireless/router enable DHCP only on the WAN port.
3.  Enable DHCP on the wireless/router

This would not be the optimal configuration, but it should also work.
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dbrucesteerAuthor Commented:
I have now connected modem/router LAN1 to Desktop LAN2 to Wirelles router WAN input
All LEDs normal
Can access the Modem router 10.1.1.1 but not wireless router 192.168.2.1. from Desktop

Modem router has the following help
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Advanced Setup | Routing | Static Route
The device supports static route function. The static routing related parameters is described as followings,
Index - the index of the entry. Check the index button to delete or modify the entry.
Network Address - the network address of the route. Network address 0.0.0.0 and Subnet mask 0.0.0.0 indicate the default route.
Subnet Mask - the subnet mask of the route. Network address 0.0.0.0 and Subnet mask 0.0.0.0 indicate the default route.
Gateway - the gateway used to route this packet specified in this entry

Advanced Setup | Routing | RIP
The device supports Routing Information Protocol (RIP) v1 and v2 to dynamically exchange routing information with adjacent routers. The RIP related parameters are described as followings,

RIP mode - the operation mode. The overall RIP function can be enabled and disabled.
Auto Summary - the automatic route merging. With this option several routes to subnets under a same supernet can be replaced with a single route to that supernet in order to save routing table space.
Operation Mode - the RIP functionality. The RIP function can be disabled (Disable), enabled for full function (Enable) or just for receiving only (Silent).
Version - the RIP version. Both version 1 and 2 are supported.
Poison Reverse - the Poison Reversion option. With this option the VoIP Router will put routes learned from each neighbor into the updating RPDU with metric of 16 for better network convergence.
Authentication Required - the RIP authentication. With RIP version 2 authentication mechanism can be used to secure the routing exchange.
Authentication Code - the RIP authentication key
Except global RIP mode and Auto Summary parameters, the others are network-interface-wise.

Advanced Setup | Routing | Routing Table
The run-time routing table. Several types of route are supported. The Flag code is to identify different types of route,

C - directly connected.
R - RIP.
I - ICMP redirect.
S - static.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Should I set these up to allow a route from LAN1 to LAN2?

thanks for your help

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dbrucesteerAuthor Commented:
Limited success
I can access the wireless router via the notebook - because I had previously set up a wireless connection.  DHCP is still enabled on the wireless/router
So the problem now is how to route from LAN1 to LAN2 thru the modem/router. ie So I can access the
wireless/router from the desktop

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dbrucesteerAuthor Commented:
My solution has the following steps

1) Assumiing modem router is working correctly via cable to desktop, check the IP range thatit allocates ie Set to DHCP If it starts at 192.168.2.1 it will allocate LAN1 port to 192.168.2.2, LAN2 port 192.168.2.3. etc ( if set to another range just remember that the LAN ports are consequent number
2) Connect wireless modem to laptop via cable and set up wireless parameters in notebook and wireless modem
Set it as a  Access Point set the IP address as 192.168.2.3
3) Plug the wirelless modem to LAN2 port on modem router

Everything should now Work!
if not the desktop should be able to connect to the IP address of both the modem router and the wireless for fine tuning

The big advantage of this is that when the notebook does NOT require wireless access the wireless modem can be switched off.


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Vee_ModCommented:
Closed, 500 points refunded.
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