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HP printer receiving get-request and sending destination unreachable?

Posted on 2007-04-06
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We have an HP Laserjet 4200 which is receiving SNMP "Get-requests" from our other networks not here at the main location.  These hosts are on different private networks.  Also, the printer is sending out ICMP "Destination unreachable (port unreachable)" packets in response.

First, why are the packets even reaching the printer since it's on a different network, and secondly, how do I stop it as it seems to be creating quite a bit of traffic.
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Question by:lloydr1l
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hladamjr earned 2000 total points
ID: 18864493
Take a lookat this tutorial on ICMP requests:
http://www.faqs.org/docs/iptables/icmpconnections.html
Note : A simple example would be the ICMP Host unreachable or ICMP Network unreachable. These should always be spawned back to the host if it attempts an unsuccessful connection to some other host, but the network or host in question could be down, and hence the last router trying to reach the site in question will reply with an ICMP message telling us about it. In this case, the ICMP reply is considered as a RELATED packet.

Do you have SNMP disabled on the printer? It can be disabled but thats not necesarily a good thing. Sounds like you have a device that is broadcasting requests all of a sudden and it's the cause not the printer.

Just a guess
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Author Comment

by:lloydr1l
ID: 18864702
I'll check the link.  You are correct, SNMP is disabled.  We have seen increased network traffic, and in the process of trying to find out where all the traffic is coming from, I noticed lots of SNMP traffic coming from this particular printer.  So I disabled it for now.  It also seemed to be broadcasting a lot.  So I guess that explains the ICMP messages.  But what about the get-requests from other networks, why I they even there?
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Expert Comment

by:hladamjr
ID: 18864798
Somethings apparently is braoadcasting from the other networks, you could block them at the firewall to keep them off your network till they figure it out on that end.
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Author Comment

by:lloydr1l
ID: 18864829
How would they even get to the firewall, it's from a private network somewhere else on the Internet?
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Expert Comment

by:hladamjr
ID: 18864876
Anything outside your network " should " be going through your firewall. If you aren't blocking those types of requests then they are allowed into your network. You don't say how big your network is and if you are runing AD and what type of servers etc......

Do you allow vendors or contractors on your network? If so one of them may be broadcasting, what is the IP you are getting requests from?
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Author Comment

by:lloydr1l
ID: 18864898
They are from the 10 range, private.  These are not supposed to be routed over the Internet, so the firewall shouldn't even be seeing them, I thought.
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by:hladamjr
ID: 18865104
Then it's coming from inside your network from a device. How many devices, if you have disabled SNMP on the printer and still have the traffic then you need to look elsewhere. Sounds like you need to post this in the Networkingif thats the case as this is relatedto HP printers only.
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Author Comment

by:lloydr1l
ID: 18865138
Do you know how to reduce the broadcasts from this particular printer (4200)?
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by:hladamjr
ID: 18865187
If you have disabled SNMP and are still getting braodcasts from it then you should replace the network interface card in it. Please clarify something for me tho in your post you say:

We have an HP Laserjet 4200 which is receiving SNMP "Get-requests" from our other networks not here at the main location.  These hosts are on different private networks.

If it is "recieving get requests then the printer is not the device that is the issue. It is some other device. you say also "from our other networks not here at the main location". Just because it is a private subnet does not that they cannot be receved on your network. If the other network or donain is trusted and you have a pipe to it etc etcthen you can recieve traffic from the other " private network"

 As I said if the printer is "GETTING" requests then it is not the source of the problem. It may create additional traffic with its response to requests but it is not the source of the requests

Clarify your network topolgy a little more and that might help.
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Author Comment

by:lloydr1l
ID: 18865307
No, I meant when I enable SNMP again, how would I reduce the broadcasts.  As for topology, we have several stores, and one main location.  Everything is independent, each with it's own private IP range, no pipe, no WAN, just the Internet to go through.  I wasn't saying that the printer was the issue in getting requests, but wanting to know why it was receiving them in the first place, given that the source IP was on another network somewhere else.  

If I were to enable SNMP right now, capture packets off of the network and view the traffic, I would see get-request's coming from hosts on other networks from our stores.  I'm not sure why this is happening.
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Expert Comment

by:hladamjr
ID: 18865404
Have you ( or someone else without your knowledge) ever transfered equipment from one location to the other recently? If so then that piece of hardware may have it's old IP still and is soomehow doing the broadcasting on the network your having problems on. At some point in time if something was brought from another location and some inadvertenly was connected alsowithout changing an IP could that have occured?
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Author Comment

by:lloydr1l
ID: 18865497
Well the capture shows the IP addresses coming from the firewall (firewall's MAC address).  I do move things around, but can't think of a situation where I didn't change the address to match the appropriate network.  People do come here with their laptops, and they have this printer installed for printing when here, but would it then try and somehow find this printer via SNMP when in another location over the Internet?
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Expert Comment

by:hladamjr
ID: 18865537
Yes absolutely, thats why I mentioned earlier to block it at the firewall. Block SNMP traffic and you've solved the issue.. If all your routers are on the same ISP the traffic will be passed. Sounds like your letting SNMP traffic in but not out. Thus the printer is responding and the firewall is blocking it from getting out and sending the response that the host was un-reachable.  ( Or your blocking it on the other end)
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:hladamjr
ID: 18865545
Not that I won't continue to help but as I mentioned earlier this really isn't a printer issue as much as it is a networking issue. For a better response to your real issue I suggest you post this issue in Networking. you'll also get more reponses for your REAL issue also.
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Author Comment

by:lloydr1l
ID: 18865567
I already did, it was one of my 3.  Thanks for the info.
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