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Why does my pc turn itself off immediately after I try to power-up?

Posted on 2007-04-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I have a ten-year-old system, which, by and large, has been very good over the years. It's still behaving itself really quite well, but for some reason it has suddenly started turning itself off immediately I press the power switch to boot-up each morning*. It keeps going, as it were, at the second, third or fourth attempt, but obviously something is not quite right.

Any suggestions much appreciated, but, *please*, in simple language. I'm not a techie by any stretch.

Many thanks

Neil C

*I've never really known the ideal, if there is one, with regard to leaving on 24/7, turning off each night, 'stand-bys' and 'turn-offs'; I've always turned off at night and my settings (W98, by the way) are screensaver after 10', turn off monitor after 15' and hard disks (I have two; the original small disk and a much larger, more recently installed, D disk) after 20'. Systems is on never. Any advice on this, too, much appreciated
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Question by:Ennnceee
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by:blue_zee
ID: 18869094
It seems to be hardware related.

One question though: does it turn off after loading Windows or before that?

Zee
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by:TelnetServices
ID: 18869106
Can you clarify a little...

Does it turn off IMMEDIATELY - ie you turn on, maybe power fans spin half a second etc, amybe LEDs flash on - but then it goes off...

OR

Do you get into loading windows, it gets to Windows (or part way there) and then shuts down.

If the former - considering the age of the PC - I'd say that your power supply is on it's way out...  Depending on how comfortable you are going inside your PC - it's a fairly simple fix (though word of warning - if you have an old "AT" cased PC (the button clicks ON/OFF like a ballpoint pen rather than just presses) - the power button actually switches mains voltages - you might want to be careful here)

If the latter could be one of  many hardware issues ... although a good tip (might even fix situation #1) would be to give the inside of your PC a clean using an air duster, and remove, and re-seat all internal cards, including RAM chips.

It could also be that the PC is on it's way out - maybe the motherboard is faulty... look out in your area for suppliers of ex-lease computers - you can almost certainly pick up a 3 year old pc for very little money!!

Good luck
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18869212
Yes,*immediately*. It turns off *before* loading, then, when I try once or twice again, it stays on.
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by:blue_zee
ID: 18869363
How long has it been since you opened the box and gave it a thorough cleanup?

That is the first troubleshooting step.

Clean it up, make sure all fans are working freely, the air circulates without obstacles, etc..

Are you at ease with the inside of a PC?

Take out the RAM sticks, clean the slots and place them back.

Check all cables and plugs making sure they are firmly in place.

Post back the results after the above.

Zee

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by:v2Media
ID: 18869436
A pc landed on my bench with exactly the same symptoms last month. After doing the usual troubleshooting steps (refit everything, barebones, component elimination), it turned out the motherboard was faulty. My guess, a cracked solder join that firmed up after the board got a bit warm.

The motherboard got replaced.
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by:
Mark earned 125 total points
ID: 18869453
More than likely if you look at the motherboard you will find bad capacitors. This is a classic example of this type of issue, and requires either the capacitors(not really worth it)  or the motherboard to be replaced . Here are some pictures of what to look for.
http://www.badcaps.net/ident/ just clcik on the pistures to get a closer look.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18869620
To answer your question blue zee, no, not at all familiar with the inside of a pc; at least not nearly enough to try anything myself.

Is motherboard replacement generally an expensive job?

And I presume I would need a motherboard specific to this pc?
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by:blue_zee
blue_zee earned 125 total points
ID: 18869673
Before starting to spend money, please turn off the PC, unplug the power cord, open the case and give it a good cleanup.

That is simple and you don't need any special skills.

If that doesn't help, maybe you have a friend that has some knowledge and might take a look at other basic checkups? A "friendly" repair store?

If you start spending money on a 10 year old PC, you simply be throwing it away.

It may be worth checking second hand but newer machines or even better, new ones.

I understand your worries, but these are options you should understand.

Please feel free to post here your doubts and we will be happy to respond.

Good luck,

Zee
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by:Mark
ID: 18869675
Your correct, the specifics of the motherboard , ram and CPU would be older technology and not readily available other than secondhand. There is a small program that you can download that will give you all the info you need on the specs for these components call CPUz
click this link to download it. http://www.cpuid.com/download/cpu-z-139.zip
Unzip the file and just click the CPUz icon. Each tab holds the info for particular components.
post them here and we'll see if parts can be found.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18869890
Will do. May take me a day or two now as Easter holidays beckon. Bear with me, I'll be back after the holiday.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18869900
Further thought. Will this fault just keep repeating itself or will it eventually fail to power-up completely? Just wondering if I should leave it on 24/7 now, or indeed whether that's ever a good idea.

Thanks a lot

Neil C
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by:blue_zee
ID: 18869913
Personally I would NOT leave it on 24/7, even if there is a chance of it not booting at all.

Zee
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by:Mark
ID: 18869927
It will probably get to the point it won't startup at all. The only fear I would have is another component such as the hard drive getting a voltage that it shouldn't rendering it dead. Not a likely scenario but a possibility. Anytime electrical anomalies are introduced to a computer that depends implicitly on steady good power supply, components can deteriorate over time. If there are important files on your hard drive, it would be prudent to remove the drive to another computer to  back them up as these problems can cause corruption in files.
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by:willcomp
willcomp earned 50 total points
ID: 18870049
See if you can find a friend or repair shop that will connect another power supply and test.  Like sparkmaker, I believe the problem is most likely a weak capacitor, but it may be in power supply rather than on motherboard.  You do not need to connect all the drives, just the ATX (20 pin) connector on motherboard.

A good cleaning definitely won't hurt and will make working inside easier.

Although swelling or leaking of capacitors is a sure sign of impending failure, capacitors also fail without any visible exterior damage.  Do inspect them while cleaning out exterior though.  Tops should be flat and no leakage.  Pay special attention to larger ones located around CPU socket.
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by:Justin Malone
ID: 18872638
another possibility is that the fan on the processor  has gone bad and it is overheating and turning itself off to prevent damage to the hardware.
and with all the other possibilitys out there it is likely that if you are not comfortable opening your pc up and messing wih the equipment then there is a good chance you wont be able to do this yourself.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18880746
(Motherboard details to follow in this post.)

Yes, I think I  need that friendly repairer to give it a good clean and check the fans and so on.

I do take the point about the age of the system and so on, but I've kind of become attached to it and the thought of having to reinstall everything and so on frightens me just a little. There's also have the problem of having parallel ports and backing-up. At the moment I use bootitng, which I learned about here, and which, as I understand it, places an image of the original small C disk on to the newer, much larger, D disk, so that if C died I'd have a back-up on D. Otherwise, because of the parallel ports, as I understand it, I can't really back-up externally (other than obviously limited floppys) because I don't have any USB facilities which would enable me to attach an external hard drive, for example. I suppose I could back-up online, but really have no idea what is involved or how complex it is.

So, I thought I might purchase a laptop to use as the main pc and try to keep this in the best possible order, but use sparingly.

However...here are the motherboard details:

Manufacturer: ASUSTeK Computer Inc.
Model: SP97-V Rev: 1.XX
Chipset: SiS 5597 Rev: 02
Southbridge: SiS LPC Bridge

BIOS
Brand: Award Software Inc.
Version: 401A0-0103V
10/3/97

Version: 1.39

Many thanks

Neil
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by:blue_zee
ID: 18880770
It is indeed 10 years old, CPUs up to P-233 (from the manual).

I am afraid it will not be easy to replace, if you want a similar one. Probably on eBay but very risky business anyway.

The alternative is a upgrade with a more recent motherboard, CPU, RAM, etc.

Basically you would only save the HDD's.

The idea of a portable is a good one and maybe a simple cleanup helps give some extra longevity to that old PC you have.

Good luck.

Zee
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by:TelnetServices
TelnetServices earned 75 total points
ID: 18881027
I would suggest replacing the PC, and getting an external USB hard drive enclosure.  You can remove your hard disk from your existing PC - this is a very easy task - and install the disk into an external enclosure.  You can then connect to the disk via USB from a new PC and access all your old data.

Even with no experience in computer hardware, you should be able to do this safely.  A little digging, and I've found you some step-by-step instructions... http://computershopper.com/howto/200703_build_your_own_external_hard_drive

So, if you've already decided to get a new PC - I would advise you to go for it, and get the best of both worlds - and get access to your old data through USB
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18887482
Telnet, I appreciate your trouble and will look at that closely, but I must admit I'd be very worried about trying that, however simple it seems. But I will look at it.

As I have two disks in this pc, could they both be saved and accessed externally, or, come to that, internally? Could they both be installed in a new pc and, whether internal or external, would all the current content still be on them?

Zee, if I did want to look at eBay for a replacement motherboard, if only for interest, what would be the keywords/letters/numbers I'd be looking for?

Many thanks

Neil
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by:TelnetServices
ID: 18887499
If you take your PC to a friendly PC shop, and tell them that youy want your hard disks in external cases, I'm sure they'd do it for you for little or nothing.

They can be installed in a new PC - but not a laptop (hence the external case idea) and all the current content will still be there (although you might not be able to run installed software  without a lot of messing about)

It is unlikely you would find the same motherboard again - and I would suggest it's probably not even worth bothering!!!  For the same money as you could get a 10 y/o board for (if it works) you could probably buy a newer better PC.  Then again - you might get lucky - someone might throw you one for free!!!!

THat said - if you are worried about swapping HDD's then a motherboard sway is pretty major surgery....
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by:TelnetServices
ID: 18887500
sway=swap .. fingers not behaving today!
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by:willcomp
ID: 18887668
Your motherboard is a Baby AT form factor Socket 7 (Pentium) motherboard.  Finding a compatible motherboard will be difficult.  I took a quick look and did not find any for sale.  Motherboard will need to support whatever CPU you have as well.  Most Socket 7 boards will not support a 233MHz MMX CPU.

A Super Socket 7 Baby AT form factor motherboard will also work.  The Super Socket 7 boards will accept Pentium class CPUs greater than 233MHz such as AMD K6/2 CPUs as well as most Intel Pentium CPUs.

The few Socket 7 boards I found for sale were all uATX or ATX form factor.
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by:blue_zee
ID: 18887860

Neil,

Regarding replacement of the motherboard, I wouldn't put it better than willcomp.
:)

Zee
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by:PCBONEZ
ID: 18889304
I disagree with it being hard to replace.
For one:
Those level of systems rarely need an exact replacement motherboard to be happy.
For two:
Here's one for $8 with 128MB of RAM and an AMD 333MHz CPU.
http://cgi.ebay.com/Asus-SP97-V-Socket-7-MB-AMD-K6-2-333-cpu-128-RAM-combo_W0QQitemZ180105615349





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by:blue_zee
ID: 18889603
You are free to disagree but I wouldn't spend 1 cent on a second or third hand replacement ex-eBay, even if I did suggest that.

Even if $10 plus shipping, isn't that much really...

But on top of that we don't yet know if a visit to a friendly repair shop and a cleanup will not solve the problem.

It's up to Neil to point us in the direction he wants to go.

Zee
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by:PCBONEZ
PCBONEZ earned 50 total points
ID: 18890180
As said before I would suspect failing capacitors.
As not said before they may be in the power supply and not on the motherboard.

A note: The onboard video is typically grumpy on SIS 55xx chipset based boards.
- As in it's usually better to use a video card than fiddle with the on-board video.

I'm assuming that you are using Windows 98.
Motherboard swaps with Windows 98 aren't so bad.
Usually you have to deal with the new drivers auto-installing on the first boot.
Then you need to load the correct chipset and video drivers drivers for the new board (if Windows 98 didn't already.).
Reboot - More drivers install - Reboot. [over and over until it's done.]
But that's about all there is to it.

After Win98 things got a bit nastier but it can be done.
(Either way back up your data first!)

With Win98 you can pretty much upgrade the board to anything you want.
Depending on what that is you may also need different memory and a CPU with cooler.
If you look hard enough you can find AT Form factor boards up to Pentium-3 and some will even support 1 GHz processors. (I know this for sure. I have one each AT form factor 1 GHz boards in Slot-1 and socket 370. (I wanted to re-use some of my old AT cases.) [The P-3 boards will use 168-pin memory]
AT Form factor "Super-7" boards are easier to find, usually not expensive, and many go up to 550 MHz using an AMD K6-2 Processor. [Most of these use 168-pin SDRAM but some used 72 pin memory (as your current board has). There a few with both type memory slots so you could use either-or 168/72 pin memory. (You can't -mix- the memory types. - It's either/or.)]
.
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by:willcomp
ID: 18890238
Bonez --> I did mention that PSU may have bad caps as well and recommended swapping power supply.  Mobo will accept both ATX and AT PSUs.
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by:PCBONEZ
ID: 18890267
Zee
I do disagree.
The asker is admittedly "not a techie", probably doesn't know any 'friendly' repair shops, and is apt to get rooked trying to find one.
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by:PCBONEZ
ID: 18890280
willcomp
My guess is the case is AT.
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by:PCBONEZ
ID: 18890413
Ennnceee
You are doing fine with your on/off program.

Bad leaving it on:
Electricity use.
Subject to power surges.
If it's online all the time subject to virus's / hackers.

Bad turning it off.
Heat-up and cool down cycles are hard on electronics.
[The tiny electrical connections between the leads and the actual silicon chips are stressed as things expand and contract.]

There is no dead right answer. It's a compromise / preference.
.
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by:Mark
ID: 18890951
If it is the PSU giving the trouble, this motherboard accepts both AT and ATX style PSU's. To change this out Should be the first step as an ATX PSU should be relatively easy to get.
On another note, I have been looking through my stock of parts(funny how they build up over time) and I have some baby AT motherboards that if need be could be rescued, only problem is none of them have an ATX PSU connection only the AT type. If you're interested I can test one and let you have one for the price of shipping.
If not thats fine too.
I hate seeing anything of use go to waste.
To get in touch check my profile.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18892462
Oh dear! What a lot to take in! Don't know that I know a 'friendly repair shop' exactly, but do know (sorry, three knows in half a sentence!) one or two friendly repairers, singular, who would probably at least give it a clean. Could then take it from there.

I appreciate all your contributions. Thanks.

Neil
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by:blue_zee
ID: 18893377
Neil,

Go with the friendly repairers and see what they think of it after the cleanup.

And thank you for my (small) part of the appreciations.

Zee
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by:BillDL
BillDL earned 75 total points
ID: 18909741
Ennnceee
You've had some really detailed and excellent advice from all the other contributing experts, so I'm not going to clutter this up with any educated guesses as to what may be causing the problem or how to fix it.

I'm just picking up on something you mentioned earlier about there being two hard drives - one with Windows on it and the other used to create a backup or separate backups to.  There's something quite important here in addition to the age of the computer itself, and that is the age of the hard drives.

Hard drives are made from moving parts that were never intended to last forever, and my guess is that the C: Drive is probably the original hard drive (ie. 10 yrs old) and that the larger D: Drive has been added a bit later on.  In my opinion you shouldn't be relying on the fact that you may be able to keep accessing all the documents, pictures, emails, and all the other irreplaceable data you have stored to those hard drives over the years and must (as a matter of urgency) get your personal files copied off the hard drives and onto a much newer and reliable hard drive plus optionally also onto CD's.

My suggestion is to locate a friend or acquaintance with a fairly good technical knowledge of the hardware side of computing and with a spare computer into which you can connect each of your hard drives one at a time as the 2nd drive and copy the irreplaceable files onto the main hard drive of that computer.  Hopefully that computer would also be equipped with a CD Writer drive which could additionally be used to copy the files onto as a 2nd backup.

The concept is quite simple in that computers with one hard drive allow you to connect a 2nd hard drive as a "slave", and all you have to do is move a small plastic-covered cap from one set of fine metal pins on the back of the hard drive so that they are over another set of pins marked as "slave" rather than "master".  You then just connect the spare connector from the flat wide ribbon cable, and a spare power connector, onto the hard drive that you removed from the problem computer.

All that means is that if you add your own C: hard Drive to another computer as the slave to its own hard drive that has Windows on it, then it will still boot to that computer's operating system and not to the version of Windows on the drive from your problem computer.  You would then be able to explore all the folders on your hard drive to copy files from there to the main hard drive of the computer you have connected it into.  It's probably just the same as the way your D: Drive is currently connected as a slave to your main hard drive in the problem computer.

As well as actual files you have created over the years, you would presumably also like to save your emails and maybe some other settings.  Not all settings can be retrieved and backed up, but it is possible to gather up some of the more important ones that you would be able to re-use if you bought a new or newer computer perhaps with a different version of Windows installed.

More advice can be given on how to find and save some of the files like your Outlook Express emails, etc. if you consider this to be a viable option.  Personally I see this as your most realistic option.

Perhaps you may prefer to hang off for now and take up on Sparkmaker's kind offer.  Sorry, this comment turned out to be longer than I first anticipated, but I've tried to bear in mind that you are "not a techie by any stretch" :-)

Bill
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by:BillDL
ID: 18909743
Oh yes, just one other thing.  Do you have your original Windows 95, 98, or 98SE installation CD?
Replacing the motherboard with another one may ask you to insert your Windows CD.  Sometimes the main contents of the CD have been copied to the hard drive, so if you have lost the CD you may still be able to create one using those files if you go down the road of slaving your drive to another computer and burning files to a CD.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18914346
Still absorbing all of above, for which thanks.

However, am in the process of finding that 'friendly repairer' and in fact probably know someone already. Will get in  touch with him this week and ask for a good all-round 'clean' and so on. As has been suggested several times, that seems a good place to start.

Thanks for the offer sparkmaker; will see how the clean goes and take it from there. Am in the UK, but don't suppose that's a problem.

PCBONEZ, yes, W98. In fact I think I'm W98SE.

Bill, no, don't have the CD, but think my 'friendly repairer' does. PC has  the original, very small, C disk, with a much larger and newer secondary, D, disk. Must admit to being confused about backing-up processes (whether one has to back-up/copy individual pieces of data or can do it in one fell swoop, so to speak), but, as mentioned at beginning, I do fairly regularly use bootitng to copy an image of C on to D. As I understand it, this places an exact copy of C on D, so that, for example, if C died I would still have D and original content.  Don't know if PC would boot-up from D, but guess we're getting into other areas now.

PC was fine yesterday, this morning it immediately turned itself off half a dozen times before powering up.

Wondering if I should close this question  now or leave open until after clean, which may take a while.

Thanks again

Neil
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by:willcomp
ID: 18914373
One overlooked possibility is the power switch which will apply only if you have an ATX power supply and a momentary contact power switch.

An ATX switch can stick in and not release.  PC will turn off after a short delay -- usually 5 to 10 seconds.

Check switch to ensure it is returning to normal position after being depressed to turn on.

If you have an AT power supply, then switch would normally stay in until pressed again to turn off (unless it's a rocker switch).
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by:Mark
ID: 18914670
I'm in Canada, and mail service is quite good between here and the UK.
Leave this open until you get some news  on it. If it stays open to long a moderator will give you a nudge to let you know its been awhile.
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by:PCBONEZ
ID: 18944207
I didn't re-read all of this today so if I repeat something already said sue me.
[I don't have any money anyway so I'm not worried.]

Problems that come and go like that are -usually- due to faulty capacitors.
Given the vintage of your system -- ( It pre-dates fiasco where the market was flooded with millions of capacitors with bad chemicals,,, and Pentium-I, Pentium-II systems weren't that 'hard' on motherboard capacitors because of the lower frequencies used. ) - I would suspect the capacitors inside the Power Supply first. (They get a lot of heat in there and much more 'abuse' that the MoBo caps on you particular system.)

I suggest you try another power supply first.
As this is a random sporatic problem you may want to borrow one for a week or so from that 'friendly repairer' to make sure it actually fixes the problems before you actually buy one.
.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18963652
Have now been able to make contact with friendly repair man, although probably can't get pc to him for a few days.

He agrees that it could be the power supply (or the motherboard). Silly question, I know, but I presume this (and above references) refers to internal power source. Can obviously check with FRM but if power supply Is replacement simple and inexpensive?

As an aside, some time ago I bought some extra memory, thinking I might try to install it myself. Unfotunately, I never got round to it. If FRM finds there's still some life in the pc I might ask him to do this while he's there. I understand it's a very simple procedure and doesn't interfere with any settings at all.

One other point while I'm here. TelnetServices said earlier that the disks from this pc - that is, the original very small disk, C, and the more recent, much larger disk, D - could be installed in a new pc. Would that be in place of, or in addition to? If the latter this would presumably mean three disks. Is this possible?

I'll be back as soon as possible, or sooner if anything to respond to.

Neil
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by:blue_zee
ID: 18963780
Neil,

Hopefully it's as simple as the power supply, and inexpensive.

The HDD's can be put in a new PC, either way: only with those 2 HDD's or already with one HDD, then totalling 3.

Zee
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by:BillDL
ID: 18965956
Neil
Your motherboard will have two sockets like the coloured ones shown in these images, however yours probably won't be fancy colours:

http://www.hardwarezone.com/img/data/articles/2004/1192/07-optical-ide_mobo.jpg

http://images.tomshardware.com/2005/11/23/pc_interfaces_101/ide_w_cable.jpg

Look carefully at the writing on the motherboard at the left of the sockets and you will see "IDE1" and "IDE2".  Some call them IDE0 and 1, or PrimaryIDE and SecondaryIDE respectively.

You can have one of these ribbon cabled connected to each of those sockets:
http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/z_000517idecable40.jpg
and each ribbon cable will have two connectors along its length that connect to hard drives or CD Drives.

One of the connectors on each cable will designate the drive it is connected to as the Master or Slave drive on that channel, so you can have:

Primary IDE
       Primary Master
       Primary Slave
Secondary IDE
       Secondary Master
       Secondary Slave

The Master and Slave designations are assigned by "Jumper Caps" or shunts that fit over certain pins on the back of each drive like this:

http://www.pcstats.com/articleimages/200504/hddinstall_jump.jpg

Look at the white writing on the board underneath the pins and you should see CS, Slave, and Master.

If you use the Slave and Master pins to assign that status to the particular drive, then generally you can connect either of the connectors on the ribbon cable to either drive, but some computers like Compaq's often prefer the CD (Cable Select) setting where the end connector on the ribbon cable will always set the drive it's connected to as Master, and the middle one as the Slave.

Normally, if adding another hard drive to an existing single hard drive computer, you would have the existing hard drive as Primary Master, and you would add the additional one as Primary Slave, and reassign any CD Drive to Secondary Master.

If you do this yourself, then one thing to watch for is that there will be a missed out pin in the long IDE socket on the drive and on the motherboard.  You should see this in the bottom row of pins in the same image:
http://www.pcstats.com/articleimages/200504/hddinstall_jump.jpg
Most cables have a blocked-off hole that must align with the missing pin, and some cables also have a "key" that aligns with a notch in the socket (see image) and forces you to insert it the correct way.

Memory is quite easy to add to the motherboard yourself as long as you are sure it is the correct type.  If trying this yourself, then there are a lot of websites showing the process with good images to follow.  We can provide links if you want to try it, but one warning even if you're just looking at the memory sticks wondering if you should do it.  DON'T handle them without wearing an anti-static wrist-strap.  Small static charges can damage the chips on memory (and also motherboard components).

Bill
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 18993848
Thanks!

Hoping to get pc to friendly repair man next week, but am worried now about losing data, programmes, settings, bearing in mind previous references to backing up. Always something to worry about!

If it's the power supply and a new one is installed is there a danger of losing d, p & s in the process? One of, all of, none of...
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by:blue_zee
ID: 18993870
Technically... no risk.

Zee
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by:Mark
ID: 18994103
You can start the computer without the hard drives attached and get to the post screen . Using a live cd like knoppix will run the computer from the cd rather than the HD's for testing.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 19132245
I did say I would be a while (would never just abandon a question), but have also had a dose of unseasonal 'flu. Still, here now and the conclusion is that it is time - as suggested above - to upgrade, but - as suggested above - to install the two disks, C & D, from this old pc into an external case so that they can be accessed from a new pc.

Will close shortly, but if I'm looking, say on eBay, for said external case to take two disks, what would it be called please? What would be the keywords? External USB hard drive enclosure/s?

Thanks

Neil C

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by:Mark
ID: 19133787
Usually any multi drive enclosure would be used as a NAS(network Attached Storage) device. It would be connected through a network connection rather than a USB .
There are multi drive enclosures, but they will come with Firewire rather than USB.
http://www.cooldrives.com/duretrfienin.html
If you are upgrading perhaps a firewire port would be an option to look fo.
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 19155031
Oh, so I couldn't just get the disks put in to an external enclosure and plug in, as it were? (Unless there's a Firewire port, that is.)
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by:Mark
ID: 19155931
You can get single drive enclosures that use USB but multi drive units seem to only come in firewire flavor.
The NAS is just the next progression for storage from a straight enclosure.
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Author Comment

by:Ennnceee
ID: 19177693
I guess I should make this the last question or could go on and on when should be opening new questions, so...

Would it be possible to put each of the two disks into its own single enclosure and then just 'plug and play'? That is, plug each into its own USB port (or into a USB adapter) and then access without any complicated installation?

Many thanks

Neil
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by:Mark
ID: 19179287
yes
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by:Ennnceee
ID: 19186327
Well, thanks all. Impossible to know how to close, really, and how to award points, but I'll try. It's still working, by the way, although it takes its time to power-up, but I'm persuaded now to get a new pc and put the disks in external hard drive/s. Thanks again.
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by:blue_zee
ID: 19186452

Thank you.

Zee
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by:BillDL
ID: 19192723
Thank you Neil.
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by:Mark
ID: 19193465
Just one last word on the plug and play comment on the external case, as my last post may have been misleading. The data will be readily accessable but you will need to reinstall any programs on those disks.

Cheers, Mark.
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