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Assigning an array using {}'s

Posted on 2007-04-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-14
I have an array of floats that is declared like:

float x1[3];

I then later want to do something like:

x1 = {1.5,3.2,4.5};

but it seems I can only do that on initialisation. Is there some way to do this such as using an array copy routine?
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Question by:MrModest
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Infinity08 earned 250 total points
ID: 18869523
>> but it seems I can only do that on initialisation.

Indeed. The { } syntax for array initialization can only be used when defining/declaring the array :

      float x1[3] = {1.5,3.2,4.5};

You could do something like this if you really need it :

    float x1[3] = { 0.0 };  // <---- initialize to all 0's

    {
        float x1_tmp[3] = {1.5,3.2,4.5};                // <---- create a temporary array with the values we want ...
        memcpy(x1, x1_tmp, 3 * sizeof(float));      // <---- copy that temporary array into the x1 array
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {     // <---- the x1 array now contains the desired values
        cout << x1[i] << endl;
    }


Of course you could also use a function to populate your array :

    void populate_array(float (&x1)[3]) {
        float x1_tmp[3] = {1.5,3.2,4.5};                // <---- create a temporary array with the values we want ...
        memcpy(x1, x1_tmp, 3 * sizeof(float));      // <---- copy that temporary array into the x1 array
        return;
    }

and call it like this :

    float x1[3] = { 0.0 };  // <---- initialize to all 0's

    populate_array(x1);

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {     // <---- the x1 array now contains the desired values
        cout << x1[i] << endl;
    }
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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Infinity08
ID: 18869528
Oh, and a good idea is to inline that function :

    inline void populate_array(float (&x1)[3]) {
        float x1_tmp[3] = {1.5,3.2,4.5};                // <---- create a temporary array with the values we want ...
        memcpy(x1, x1_tmp, 3 * sizeof(float));      // <---- copy that temporary array into the x1 array
        return;
    }
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Author Comment

by:MrModest
ID: 18869538
Thanks, I figured I would have to do something like that.
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