Perl cannot print contents of document to Web browser

Perl 5 problem.  I just installed Perl 5.8.8 Build 20 on an new Windows 2003 server.  I am for some reason uanable to print the contents of a file to a web browser.  However, if I run the same script at the command line, I see all the correct output from the file there.  Why can I not get a handle on the any lines from the file and print them to the browser even using the below simple code.


#!/usr/local/bin/perl
print "Content-type: text/html\n\n";
print "<HTML>\n";
open(FILES, "test.dat") or warn "no file exists: $!";
$record = <FILES>;
print "$record";
print "</HTML>\n";
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NoodlesWIUAsked:
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ahoffmannCommented:
check your error log file of the web server, most likely your web server cannot execute the file (probably due to lack of a known interpreter)
0
NoodlesWIUAuthor Commented:
Actually I was able to partially resolve it.  For some reason I have to type in the absolute path of the file as apposed to the relative path.  ie.)  my script is in a sub folder of the root say folder 1, I should be able to use this script because the file is relative to where the script is at.

open(FILES, "test.dat") or warn "no file exists: $!";
$record = <FILES>;
print "$record";

instead I found that I have to do this...

open(FILES, "./folder1/test.dat") or warn "no file exists: $!";
$record = <FILES>;
print "$record";

Why do I have to type the absolute path instead of the relative path where the actual script file is at?  I would like to change this if possible
0
ozoCommented:
Actually a path starting with . is a relative path.
you can
use Cwd;
print getcwd;
to show the current working directory.
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xaniusCommented:
Well.

acoordiung to your (partlyx successfule code),

#!/usr/local/bin/perl
print "Content-type: text/html\n\n";
print "<HTML>\n";
open(FILES, "folder1/test.dat") or warn "no file exists: $!";
$record = <FILES>;
print "$record";
print "</HTML>\n";

would work ....
0
ozoCommented:
the current working directory is not necessarily where the script is,
is is usually the current working directory inherited from the parent that invoked the script
0
ozoCommented:
if you want to set the current working directory to the directory that the script is in, you might try
use File::Basename;
chdir dirname($0);
or
chdir dirname(__FILE__);
0
NoodlesWIUAuthor Commented:
Interesting.  In all of my previous experience, the working directory was always the directory where the original file was located.  Example being in HTML coding with regards to images.  if the html file was in the same directory as the image, I would always use <img src="./image_name.ext">  I am still used to Microsoft products however am delving deeper into linux using Asterisk for my PBX system, So I am still somewhat of a novice in regards to linux enviornments.

So how does the working directory change?
0
mjcoyneCommented:
The working directory of the web server (which is executing the script when it fails) is different than what you're using at the command line (where the script works).
0
ozoCommented:
Whoever calls the script can set the working directory that it starts with.
the current working directory has nothing to do with the base href used in img src links.
0

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