Java to C# - 500 pts. less than 15 lines

Please help translate these few lines of java code into C# ...

//Gets a calendar using the default time zone and locale. Calendar returned is based on the current time in the default time zone with the default locale.
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
long time = 1036074738312;
int day = 31;

cal.setTimeInMillis(time);                                      // Sets this Calendar's current time from the given long value.  long millis param is the new time in UTC milliseconds from the epoch.
if (cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) == day) {                  
       ...  do some stuff here ...
}
lblincAsked:
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kingtam2000Commented:
From what I can judge, you could use DateTime instead of Calender and use the constructor, after converting the time in milliseconds into 100-nanosecond units to form what you want:
            long time = 1036074738312;
            int day = 31;
            DateTime cal = new DateTime(time * 10000, DateTime.Now.Kind);
            if (cal.Day == day)
            {
                //Do Stuff....
            }

Hope that helps, if you have any questions, just post a comment
0
lblincAuthor Commented:
Using time = 1036074738312 above, it appears is returning a year of  0033,  when actually i believe that 1036074738312 represents a day (31) from the year of 2003.  

What about adding the basetime to your DateTime cal  in order  to account for the time before 1970 ?  

DateTime baseTime = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0);

Can you please consider that in your answer?     Thanks.
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kingtam2000Commented:
Yes, I realised that the time would return a year of 0033, but I wasn't sure where you wanted to start from, as the epoch was slightly ambiguous.  But to account for the epoch, I would add the following line after the datetime constructor:
            cal = cal.AddYears(1970);
So, in full:
            long time = 1036074738312;
            int day = 31;
            DateTime cal = new DateTime(time * 10000, DateTime.Now.Kind);
            cal = cal.AddYears(1970);
            if (cal.Day == day)
            {
                //Do Stuff....
            }

Sorry about that, didn't check the epoch in terms of Java, if you have any further questions, just post another comment.
0

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lblincAuthor Commented:
Excellent.   Works perfect.   ;))
0
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