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Changing size of image

Posted on 2007-04-10
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Last Modified: 2010-04-03
I'm a novice at Photoshop.

I have a psd file that someone created for me.

I'd like to change the width of the whole image, without changing the respective widths of all of the elements that are part of it.

Is that possible? If so, how?

Thanks in advance.

Steve
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Question by:skbohler
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Expert Comment

by:wildbrookmedia
ID: 18883573
I think you can do this by changing the canvas size.  (I think it is under Image>Canvas Size)  Or change the image size under the same option...
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Author Comment

by:skbohler
ID: 18883673
Thanks. But I tried that. It does adjust the size, but it isn't ideal.

In my instance, I want to move the outer edges in towards the middle because the edges have a rounded corner treatment I wanted to keep.

I was hoping I could select something and drag the width smaller and keep the shape.

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Expert Comment

by:wildbrookmedia
ID: 18883725
edit>Transform and then hold the shift key whilst transforming the image size...
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walkerke earned 250 total points
ID: 18886524
Photoshop does not maintain individual objects as do vector drawing applications so you cannot select and make changes on an object level. For instance, you could not select a red rectangle which is behind and extends beyond the boundaries of a green circle without selecting the green circle as well. That is, unless the red rectangle is on a separate layer.

Since you have a PSD file, it is possible that the file is unflattened and one of the layers does indeed contain just the object you want to modify. However, transforming the object, even proportionally with the shift key, will also transform the rounded corner effect. You would actually be reducing the size of the object, corners and all.

If you wish to maintain the radius of the rounded corner, you must marquee the sides and move them in one at a time. The marquee tool is at the top-left corner of the tools palette and is selected by pressing the letter "m" on the keyboard. The move tool is to it's immediate right and is selected by pressing the "v" key. Use the marquee tool to select one side including two adjacent corners and then use the move tool to move the marqueed selection toward the center. You can use the cursor keys to move them straight or hold down the shift key to constrain the movement in a straight line. Then switch back to the marquee tool to select another side, and so on.
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Author Comment

by:skbohler
ID: 18888952
Thanks for that great explanation.

One quick question, if I may.

I want to take a photo of a person (with white background) and just put the person into another image, without the background (this probably has a name). Unfortunately, it doesn't seem as easy as using the magic wand tool because the edges of the person may not be defined enough.

But, does Photoshop have any other functionality for changing the background of a picture, or taking a photo and copying it into another image so that the background of the person becomes the color of the background of the destination photo?
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Expert Comment

by:walkerke
ID: 18894834
Masking away the background, whether white or polkadotted, is a skill with few masters. It takes patience and experience to do it seamlessly. One does not acquire experience instantly, so start out slow and try different tools until you get the effect you desire. The only advice I can give that might help is to keep your foreground and background images on separate layers and utilize image masks on a layer level whenever possible. Using image masks will allow you to adjust the seam without destroying any of the existing image. It simply hides the masked areas rather than deleting them. Feathering the edges of the seam help to blend the two images, but too much feathering can cause the images to bleed together. Always maintain a layered version of the image in case you have to make future adjustments.

Good luck
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