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Rename a Domain Controller

Posted on 2007-04-10
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I have a replacement DC and I want to rename it the old DC name and IP address.  How would I go about doing that?

Jo
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Question by:jab56
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by:Jay_Jay70
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jab56,

Have you removed the old DC completely and cleanly? your biggest problem is DNS, as long as you clean this properly then you will be fine.....i would also run through with ADSIEDIT and make sure the old box has been removed

Regards,

James
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Jay Jay70 has a good point, the proper procedure  for replacing a domain controller is as follows:-

Install Windows 2003 on the new hardware
Assign the new computer an IP address and subnet mask on the existing network
Make sure that the preferred DNS server on new machine points to the existing DNS Server on the Domain (normally the existing domain controller)

Join the new machine to the existing domain as a member server

Note: If the new Windows 2003 server is the ‘R2’ version and the existing set-up is not then you need to run Adprep  from CD2 of the R2 disks on the existing Domain controller. Adprep is in the \CMPNENTS\R2\ folder on CD2.

From the command line promote the new machine to a domain controller with the DCPROMO command from the command line
Select ‘Additional Domain Controller in an existing Domain’

Once Active Directory is installed then to make the new machine a global catalog server, go to Administrative Tools, Active Directory Sites and Services, Expand ,Sites, Default first site and Servers. Right click on the new server and select properties and tick the ‘Global Catalog’ checkbox. (Global catalog is essential for logon as it needs to be queried to establish Universal Group Membership)

Assuming that you were using Active Directory Integrated DNS on the first Domain Controller, DNS will have replicated to the new domain controller along with Active Directory.

If you are using DHCP you should spread this across the domain controllers for now. In a simple single domain this is easiest done by Setting up DHCP on the second Domain controller and using a scope on the same network that does not overlap with the existing scope on the other Domain Controller. Don’t forget to set the default gateway (router) and DNS Servers.

For now, all the clients (and the domain controllers themselves) need to have their Preferred DNS server set to one domain controller (the new one), and the Alternate DNS to the other (the old one), that way if one of the DNS Servers fails, the clients will automatically use the other.

Both Domain Controllers by this point will have Active Directory, Global Catalog, DNS and DHCP.
You now need to move the FSMO roles (including the PDC emulator from the old machine to the new machine.  You should cleanly transfer the FSMO roles. This can be done in different ways see http://support.microsoft.com/kb/255504 or http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324801 or http://www.petri.co.il/transferring_fsmo_roles.htm for alternatives methods that can be used.

You should now test that all is OK by disconnecting the old DC (just unplug the network cable). The domain should continue to function, if not then troubleshoot. Reconnect the old Domain Controller when you are satisfied all is OK.

Once you are sure that all is OK then you can either leave both Domain controllers operational, (two domain controllers are normally recommended for fault tolerance)

If you really want to get rid of the old Domain controller then:

You should make sure that all the clients are using the new Domain Controller as their preferred DNS Server - and the Alternate DNS server is blank.

Run DCPROMO on the old DC to demote it back to a member server, and then remove it from the domain.
Reconfigure the DHCP scope if required.

If you follow this guidance it should result in a clean transition. There is no need to rename anything or manually add any DNS info.

If after doing all that you want to rename the domain conttroller see http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/2ffc842c-6841-40e0-b903-fb3838f6ac261033.mspx?mfr=true
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by:jab56
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The new Server does have R2 installed, and I didn't know I had to run adprep again, so I didn't do that, but I have ran dcpromo on it and checked ithe global catalogbox already.  Is this going to be a problem?

Also, we have a total of 3 DC's in our domain and I am only replacing one of them.  I am keeping the old server in service, but I what to give the new server the same name and IP address as the old DC, then rename the old DC and demote it to be a member server.  The old DC only has DNS setup, no DHCP.  DHCP is handled by another DC.  Since I have more than 1 DC, do I still need to move the FSMO roles?

Do I need to delete the entries in DNS for the two servers when I change their IP addresses?

This DC is also the clients file and print server and that is why I want to rename the new server back to the old name so I don't have to touch each client workstation to make the change on all their shortcuts etc.

Thanks,
Jo

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by:Jay_Jay70
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Usually for myself, if i make any changes like that (IP or Name) Then DNS is the first place i start clearing.....However you also have netbios names which you will need to clear on each DC (nbtstat -RR)

Most of the time that will do it

If you have the R2 Box Promoted already then you have done everything correctly
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