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Browser and Event ID 8033

I have an issue where several of my users on XP machines recieve the following error in event viewer:

Event Source: Browser
Event ID:8033
The browser has forced an election on network \Device\NetBT_Tcpip_{51FB2599-9CF5-4678-AA9C-00F8A4F786BC} because a master browser was stopped.

Also, I noticed that in my DNS on my DC under Forward Lookup Zone, I have 2 Host(A) records of my DC. The first states DC name and IP adress. The other states (Same as parent folder) and IP adress. Should I delete 1 of those instances? And how do I fix this browser problem?
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lenivan
Asked:
lenivan
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1 Solution
 
KCTSCommented:
This message is normal, it means nothing unusual unless is repeated very often. Whenever the Master Browser machine in the network stops, an election is held to find a machine to assume that role. The reboot of a domain controller is a common reason for this event to show up in the event log.

Your DNS is fine - this is how its supposed to be.
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lenivanAuthor Commented:
But why is an XP workstation becoming a master browser? My DC has not rebooted so there is no reason for this to happen.

Is DNS supposed to have 2 Host(A) records for my DC?
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KCTSCommented:
When you machine boots it may force a browser election, there are many other events that can casue a browser election as well. As stated this is normal, unless you are getting many such messages in a very short time this is normal. The browser it is refering to is not Internet Explorer but the service that provides the 'Computers Near Me' and Network browsing features.

The records in AD identify your domain nameserver and the second is the nomal A record.
Again this is as expected and you don't need to do anything - indeed if you do DNS will stop working properly
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KCTSCommented:
Sorry I said records in AD - that should of course have been records in DNS. AD and DNS are tightly integrated.
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Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
One way to avoid this is to avoid the possibility of a workstation becoming (or trying to become) a master browser.  This involves a registry edit on the workstation in question, though:

1. Open the registry editor (Start/Run/regedit).
2. Locate the following registry entry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Browser\Parameters\  
3. Find the value of MaintainServerList and set it to No.
4. Restart the computer.
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KCTSCommented:
... but totally pointless as the a workstation is the lowest of the low in broswer elections
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Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
But he stated that he is getting this message on some of his XP workstations, which indicates that they are potential master browsers.  This is rather unusual, but can happen in certain circumstances, and my suggestion describes a way to avoid it.
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lenivanAuthor Commented:
According to eventid.net:

Anytime the Master Browser machine in the network stops, an election is held to find a machine to assume that role. The reboot of a domain controller is a common reason for this event to show up in the event log.

I'm assuming the Master Browser is my DC. Since I have not rebooted my DC, nor has it dropped offline, why is a workstation trying to assuem the role of Master Browser? What should I check on my server to see if it is dropping its Master Browser role?
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Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
This event can be triggered by turning on or connecting a workstation that thinks it is a master browser to the network.  There are a number of reasons this can happen.  One of them is that the workstation was purposely set to master browser status. Another one of them is when you are connecting from a branch office that has no domain controller through a VPN connection to the main office.  Because there's no domain controller in the branch office, one of the local machines will become a master browser for that little local peer-to-peer network.  Then, when that computer connects to the main office, it forces a browser election because it thinks it should be the master browser.  Of course, the DC in the main office always wins this election because it is a DC and a lowly little XP workstation cannot stand against it ;-)

Browsing is a strange animal in the Microsoft world, and though I've read numerous articles on it, I still don't always understand why it works the way it does...
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KCTSCommented:
Your suggestion will not stop a master broswer elction, it just stops that paticular machine assuming the master browser role, which it would not do anyway. Master browser elections occur naturally. The reported incident is not actually an error, it is a usual occurance and the old maxim 'if it ain't broke - don't fix it' must prevail.
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