MS Exchange users with the same lastname

Ok I'm trying to come away from this problem so that everyone is happy. A new admin started working at my company. the persons name is Amy smith, i noticed that "asmith" was already taken by another employee. a guy named Adam smith. so i gave the admin the user name of aasmith.  the emails follow the user name (aasmith@blah.com) but now people are assuming that adam smith is amy smith and sending him sensitive information for the admin. i was wondering if there was a way for them to both keep their emails but a way to filter the emails. is there an option somewhere to prompt a person to pick a name in exchange when they try to  email asmith? i understand this would only be possible for people who are apart of the global address list in the company.  i guess its a shot in the dark if there is anyway to make both people happy i'd love to hear it.
d3strudo80Asked:
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daveforsterCommented:
Do you have any filtering software on the server?  Something like GFI Mail Essentials or Similar.

You could create a rule in there to catch any mail that goes to asmith.  You can then check it to see if it is sensitive info or some picture of a midgit dwarf naked in Ibiza and delete or approve as required!

Hope this helps!

Dave
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bluetabCommented:
There is no way to do this that I know of.  Outlook automatically starts checking names to see if there's a match.  But if people actually type her name instead of email address Outlook will check the Global Address Book to find the correct email addresss.  If the problem is also from outside users it's going to have to be an educational process.

To keep away from typos and confusion it may be easiest to give Amy two aliases (amysmith@ and amy@).  This way people don't forget to type the second "a".  
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d3strudo80Author Commented:
crap, well i noticed that when i change someones username and email, emails sent to their old email is automaticly forwarded to their new email in outlook. how do i disable that?
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MrLonandBCommented:
She's a new hire -- so there's not that much invested. I would just make her email address something distinctly different than his: amysmith@blah.com...?
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bluetabCommented:
Why are you changing usernames the old email forwards to the new address?  What is their old and new email address?  All you should have to do is add an alias to their email address and if you want you can delete their old email address and that will stop the forwarding.  You should be able to do this from the Email Addresses tab in the user properties of AD.
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d3strudo80Author Commented:
actually i thought of an option that would help both employees, is it possible to change asmith to something else like adam smith and have all emails that are sent to asmith to bounce back at the sender with a message like " adam smith's email has been changed to adamsmith@blah.com if your trying to reach amy smith please email her at aasmith@blah.com"

any guys who can figure this out deserve a fridge full of beer and a supermodel entourage that fan them with palmtree leaves and hand feed them grapes .. or begal bites
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MrLonandBCommented:
You can do that - somewhat. Set an Outlook rule for Adam Smith. Incoming messages to him will fire back a response to the sender with the disclaimer you stated. It will only work though when he is on-line. After having said all that -- that is NOT the way I would recommend resolving the issue.

I've got the beer already...
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d3strudo80Author Commented:
hmm i suppose if i changed his name for his email and made sure the previous email handle didn't forward the emails to him i dont think the set rules option would work since there isn't really an email to begin with is there? so if he was offline  the email would just return to sender without the disclaimer? i'm going to need something more consistant if you have any ideas that would allow both parties to keep their emails i'd be happy to hear those.
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bluetabCommented:
You can setup a Server based rule so the user wouldn't have to be online.  But I agree with MrLonandB, creating a rule isn't the best way to do handle this.  Amy can use asmith and Adam can use adamsmith, but Amy is going to have to deal with getting some of Adam's email.  There's no easy way to resolve this, you're going to have to teach people the correct email addresses for the users.  Never fun when you have to do that.  Next I would talk to HR and tell them not to hire people with the same first initial last name :)
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d3strudo80Author Commented:
in most situations you would be right but Amy is the superintendent, she gets sensitive information that  adam shouldn't  see and I'm pretty sure  just changing her email handle and emailing people who are emailing her from outside the company who are familar with our naming convention and telling them the correct email wouldn't be enough because there is a slight possiblity that a senstive email could be sent to adam and they dont want any lost ends period and she wont except getting 10- 20 emails a day from people who want to talk to adam. if these were two employees lower on the totum pole this would be a non issue. i'd like to hear how to set up that server based rule.
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d3strudo80Author Commented:
nope, forgive my noobishness but isn't there  a way to do it from active directory or administrative tools?
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bluetabCommented:
AD nor anything in the administrative tools is going to do what you're looking for.  A server based rule is just a matter of setting up a rule using the Rule Wizard in Outlook.  The problem is that it won't be a very good solution for you.  You'd have to set it up on the client and then it should run from the server.  But the client would always be able to edit the rule, so what is there to keep Adam from going in and disabling the rule.  

I don't understand how a filter is going to help you.  What would you set it up to look for and how would it know if it should send the email to Adam or Amy?  Without educating people as to the correct email address for each person you are going to have to play "email cop" and filter all emails sent to asmith and manually review them before passing them on to the correct person.  There's no other way to prevent the slight possibility of having a sensitive email meant for Amy go to Adam instead.  
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