• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 609
  • Last Modified:

Move RAID5 Drives to another server

I have a Dell server with what I think is a failing RAID controller. I have another server that is the exact same specs as the server with the failing RAID controller. I want to be able to move the drives from the first server into the second server. Is this possible? How do I do it?

Specs:
Dell Poweredge 2500
Perc 3/Di RAID Controller
3 Drives in RAID5 configuration (Hardware RAID)
OS is on the RAID array
0
victornegri
Asked:
victornegri
1 Solution
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Make a FULL backup first.

Remove all drives, noting the order.
Put all drives back in the other server so that drive 1 is in the same slot number as it was.
Boot the new server.
Go into the PERC controller's BIOS and tell the PERC controller to read the config from the disks.
Save and reboot.

It's just like you changed the controller but kept the other hardware the same.
0
 
TwisteddkCommented:
Like Leew said, but make ABSOLUTELY SURE that the controllers are 100% identical, including the BIOS versions... Even the slightest variation and you could end up with a non-usable RAID. Been there done that, got the T-shit. It's NOT a pretty picture when years of work is destroyed because the RAID system WAS your backup !
If the systems are not 100% identical, you'd stand a much better chance of recovering your data by backing it up elsewhere, then move the disks, create a new RAID set and restore your backup to the new set. It's a longer process, but it's very safe.
Ofcourse if you HAVE a backup of the RAIDset, then why not just try to  plug in the disks (remember correct order) and see if it works... If it doesn't, then format and restore the backup.

Big advantage here is that you only have 3 disks. You can easily recover data from that even if the controller DOES die, as it's either right or left syncronous or asyncronous, so any good recovery software will be able to recover the data if your controller dies
0
 
victornegriAuthor Commented:
Thanks. I'll try it out.

So... I only have to put drive 1 in the same slot number? The others can be in different slots?
0
Granular recovery for Microsoft Exchange

With Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Exchange you can choose the Exchange Servers and restore points you’re interested in, and Veeam Explorer will present the contents of those mailbox stores for browsing, searching and exporting.

 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
No, ALL drives should be placed in the order they were on the old system - if the drive was in slot 0 then the drive goes in slot 0 in the new server.  If it were in slot 2, then it goes in slot two.  Putting the drives out of order can cause problems accessing data.

And Twisteddk makes a good point - make sure your firmware levels match.
0
 
victornegriAuthor Commented:
Will do. Thanks. I'll let you know what happens. Have to make a full backup first.
0
 
arthurjbCommented:
>>It's NOT a pretty picture when years of work is destroyed because the RAID system WAS your backup !

RAID is not a backup, and should not even be considered to be a backup, it is only to protect the existing data from a disk failure.  You must do a backup before messing with any RAID.

Even if you follow all the advice about rev levels, controller matching and all of that, there are still many other things that could cause the RAID to be destroyed during the move.

All the drives must be in the same slot as the were in the original machine.

And this is why a backup is critical, you have no way of telling if the slots are electrically identical.  It is possible that various updates and design changes during production runs, could cause the slots electrical value to be different.


>>Big advantage here is that you only have 3 disks. You can easily recover data from that even if the controller DOES die, as it's either right or left syncronous or asyncronous, so any good recovery software will be able to recover the data if your controller dies

The words "Easily Recover" should never be used when talking about data that spans physical drives.  If the controller dies, you MAY be able to recover data, but often, a controller's last dying gasp wipes out critical blocks on the disk(s).

Be very very careful, and treat the disks like raw eggs, don't bump them and don't get them out of order.

Good Luck!
0

Featured Post

Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now