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How to get 192.168.0.x and 192.168.3.x to play nice with each other?

Posted on 2007-07-27
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Last Modified: 2013-12-19
Hello-
I have a customer with a 16 workstation network in which 4 of the workstations cannot see the other 12.
Speciffics:
 [DSL Modem] 192.168.1.254-----192.168.1.2 [DLink Broadband router]192.168.0.1---- ------192.168.0.10[Linksys]192.168.3.1----------192.168.3.100[HP Workstation group in question]

Most (12) workstations in the network are in the 192.168.0.x network.
192.168.0.x CANNOT get ping back from 192.168.3.x
192.168.3.x DO get ping back from 192.168.0.x and 192.168.1.x network (the network between the DSL modem and the Dlink)
All 16 workstations have internet access (both the ones in the .0.x network and the .3.x)
Workstations in the .3.x network cannot see .0.x in Windows Network Neighborhood
Workstations in the .0.x network cannot see .3.x in Windows Network Neighborhood
Linksys is a basic Wireless-Broadband router WRT54G
Both the Linksys and the DLink are also wireless routers, each on with its own wireless network name.
Both the Dlink and the Linksys are DHCO servers for their own downstream networks and clients from the next router up (meaning the DSL modem acts as a DHCP server to the DLink and the Dlink acts as a DHCP server to the Linksys).
There is no 192.168.2.x

So: How can I get everyone to see everyone? - They do not necessarily need to be in different networks, that was just the way it was when I got there. I would love to set the Linksys into switch mode, but I see no way of doing that in the setup menu, the options are only DHCP clients, PPPoE, PPTP, Telstra and Fixed IP.
Also, what happens to the wireless network if I do that?, would it still work?
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Question by:HardwareDude
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8 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:davidwainwright
ID: 19581642
What subnet masks are you using? Try 255.255.254.0 instead of 255.255.255.0...

Dave
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Expert Comment

by:dhoffman_98
ID: 19581672
Almost...

I think davidwainwright is almost there.

The 255.255.254.0 subnet (a 23 bit mask) will allow 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.1.1 to work together, but that won't do anything for 192.168.3.1.

Without adding a router between the two subnets, your best option is similar to what david proposed, but change the mask to a 22 bit mask. This will allow 192.168.0.x and 192.168.3.x to work together (although it also allows any 1.x and 2.x machines to be part of the same network.

A 22 bit netmask is 255.255.252.0
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Author Comment

by:HardwareDude
ID: 19581710
Actually, the Linksys unit (between the 192.168.0.x and 192.168.3.x) is a router
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by:davidwainwright
ID: 19581772
Well spotted dhoffman!
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dhoffman_98 earned 1500 total points
ID: 19581892
Yes, the Linksys is a router, but it's a two interface router. You have your WAN interface and your LAN interface, and while it might have multiple ports on the LAN side, they are all on the same network.

If you reconfigure the LAN side of the linksys with the 255.255.252.0 subnet mask, then your machines will all be able to talk to each other.

Of course, you also will need to set the mask on your client workstations, but if you are running a DHCP server, that can be configured there.
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Author Comment

by:HardwareDude
ID: 19581894
Everything is on 255.255.255.0
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Author Comment

by:HardwareDude
ID: 19581920
OK- Let me see if the Linksys DHCP lets me configure 255.255.252.0 on its LAN clients.
Thanks in advance!
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Author Comment

by:HardwareDude
ID: 19589408
Well, unfortunately the Linksys does not allow for that netmask. I resolved the issue by simply taking out the Linksys router entirely and replacing it with a switch and a simple wireless NAP. Now everyone is on the same192.168.0.x network.
Cheers!,
HardwareDude
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