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Are there known issues using a static IP DSL line with our own mail server? Very urgent! Thanks.

We currently have an overutilized t1, and as such, mail is slow to leave from our Exch 2000 queue.  We also have access to a 6.0 mbps DSL line (for which we have a static IP block), which we're considering using for incoming and outgoing mail under the assumption that this will alleviate the mail latency problem.  But I have heard that some domains will reject mail sent from a DSL line.  Is this so, or does it only really apply to DSL lines which use static IP addresses making reverse DNS impossible?  Very urgent.  Thanks.
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QuiteSupersonic
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QuiteSupersonic
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2 Solutions
 
czcdctCommented:
There is that likelihood if your ISP are lumping blocks together.
It's irrelevant though because you can simply get the SMTP relay address/name from your ISP and then have all your mail go through the Exchange, out to the relay and then onto the Internet. Call the ISP and get the address from them.
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
CZ, Im not really following you.  All mail would already be going through exchange using an MX record already wouldn't it?  What would I use a relay for?  Are you talking about a smart host setup?  Sorry, not a mail routing pro, though I'm fairly familiar with exchange.
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czcdctCommented:
I didn't say anything about inbound email because it's irrelevant what you use. So long as the MX record points to the right place you're ok.

Regarding the outbound yes, a SmartHost is what I mean. If you use the Smarthost at the ISP you got your DSL line from to relay though the whole rejection of messages thing becomes nul and void. Since you're sending through the ISP the destination recipients see this as a valid sending server and accepts the mail.
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
A smart host is an offering by an ISP to send mail on behalf of a domain?  Is there an extra charge usually associated with that?  
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czcdctCommented:
No ISP should charge for that service. They have to offer that service to people precisely because end recipients reject messages from DHCP (or alleged) source servers/clients etc.
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
What did you mean in your second post by, lumping blocks together?
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
Also, where would my MX record point to if i use the smart host?
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
Sorry, nevermind the second question above.  As you said, the smart host only deals with outbound.
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
So are you saying, i could receive mail on the current T1 whose IP is associated with the existing mx record and just use our DSL to send outbound mail to the smart host?
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czcdctCommented:
Sure. The MX record is unchanged. What you do is change the IP address of the A record (to which the MX points) to be one of the IP addresses that is attached to the DSL line.
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
and then change the default gateway of the mail server to reflect the LAN IP address of the DSL router?
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
would the smarthost IP address be the same as the address used for the outgoing mail address if i were using pop3 through my ISP?  The reason I ask is because my DSL provider said they don't offer smart hosting.  Then again, the person I spoke to sounded clueless.
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czcdctCommented:
If you have a POP account from the ISP then they simply have to give you an SMTP server name. They might not call is a smarthost but if they let you POP mail they have to be able to let you send it. You don't send over POP so obviously it's SMTP.
What are the ISP instructions about sending email? I assume it's an account based thing?

(Btw, don't change the default gateway unless you have to. The g/w should ideally be the same as all the others unless you're on a completely flat network and it doesn't matter. Only you can work that one out)
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
The e-mail address i was given is smtp.att.yahoo.com, so hopefully that works.  All of our routers have the same internal network scheme... 192.168.x.x, though they go to different ISPs.  Yes, I'm pretty sure it's an account based thing.  We have to login using a user name and password in order to do anything.

But if i don't change the default gateway (the mail server is currently using the overburdened T1) to the DSL line, then aren't we back at square 1, which is using the slow T1 line to send e-mail to the smarthost?
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SembeeCommented:
Using a DSL line could cause you problems unless the DNS is configured 100% correctly for how the traffic is going out.
With a static IP address you will have a higher success of getting email to go out, but there will still be some sites that will refuse the message.
If you already have a static IP address, then put it in to some of the blacklist checkers and see if it is listed in any of the DUL (Dial up List). Those are listed by subnet, so if you are in that subnet you would need to get your ISP to change the IP address.

If you change the default gateway on the Exchange server and use a smart host, then the email should go out through the default gateway. The only reason it wouldn't is if you have done some manual work on the route tables of either the server or the router listed as the default gateway to change the path.

Simon.
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czcdctCommented:
Since you're on a flat network and probably don't have some high level networking skills I would indeed change the gateway on the server. It's the simplest thing to do and since you're not on a complex network you should be able to remember the differences in routing should a problem occur.
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QuiteSupersonicAuthor Commented:
Ok guys, i'm off to try this.  I will award points when i have it all completed, and when my questions come to an end.  Thank you both SO MUCH.
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