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Repeat a table heading on subsequent pages

Microsoft Word automatically repeats table headings on new pages that result from automatic page breaks.  However, Word does not repeat a heading if you insert a manual page break within a table.  Is there any way to insert a manual page break in a table and still retain the automatic heading repeat?
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S968
Asked:
S968
1 Solution
 
wct296Commented:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word/HA100343011033.aspx

Doesnt look good

quote
"Repeat a table heading on subsequent pages

When you work with a very long table, it will be divided wherever a page break  occurs. You can make adjustments to the table so that the table headings are repeated on each page.

Repeated table headings are visible only in Print Layout view  and when you print the document.

   1. Select the heading row or rows. The selection must include the first row of the table.
   2. Under Table Tools, on the Layout tab, in the Data group, click Repeat Header Rows.

 Note    Word automatically repeats the table headings on each new page that results from an automatic page break. Word does not repeat a heading if you insert a manual page break within a table"

End quote...

Will keep looking
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wct296Commented:
I just did some playing and the reason it doesnt work is because word breaks the table up into two individual tables - the properties of the new table are set back to default and hence the repeat headers property no longer applies... you can re-apply it and copy the header every time you insert a new page break... I know its a pain but it seemed like the only way I could do it. Once its setup after the page break on the new table - it repeats on automatic page breaks from then on
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harfangCommented:
You can use standard paragraph formatting to achieve this. Instead of inserting a manual page break, select the first cell on the row you want on the next page and choose (Format | Paragraph), [Line and Page Breaks], check "Page break before".

If it's more meaningful according to your layout, you can also use "Keep with next" if you want to keep any group of rows on the same page.

Cheers!
(°v°)
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franklinsamuelCommented:
Hi,

You cannot get the Table headings when you do manual page break. If the Table enough rows to continue with the next page then word will take the headings of the table puts it in the next page.

Since you are doing manual page break its not possible to get the table header in the next page. So try to copy/create the same headings which you want it from the previous page.

Regards,
Franklin Samuel
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wct296Commented:
yeh - I tried harfangs idea and it didnt work... Sorry its not that much hard work to copy the whole line of the header and re-apply it... its just a pain if the pages move
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adsy2007Commented:
why do you need to insert a new page break? if its automatic then you should already have the pages there
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wct296Commented:
I would assume you want a large table to span the document with comments or references in between, but u want sections on new pages (but with the same headings)
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harfangCommented:
> I tried harfangs idea and it didnt work...

What didn't work? Please try again:

* create table
* select first row, set as header
   (Table | Table properties) [Row], "Repeat as header row at the top of each page"
* select a cell in first column, say, A5
* (Format | Paragraph) [Line and Page breaks]; "page break before"

Works every time!
(°v°)
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harfangCommented:
Thank you, S968. -- (°v°)
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