How to set up a network with server, two network cards and no static IP address from ISP

When using a server with two NIC cards so that the modem and router are plugged into the Internet NIC and the other NIC is on the LAN side (to the switch?) what is the deal if you don't have a static IP address from your ISP. Obviously, the server has a static IP address and is the DHCP server for the clients.

-- Does the server give the IP addresses via the switch?
-- The router has DHCP turned off and is just the default gateway?
-- Is the outside part of the router just getting dynamic IP addresses from the ISP?

Sorry, I am used to a single network card with a static IP addresses and setting up the router with static those IP addresses then to a switch wherer the server is connected and sends IP and DNS to each client.

Thanks. Just a newbie at networking with servera plus two network cards plus no static IP address.
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Bert2005Asked:
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davidwainwrightConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi

The router should be configured to pickup it's IP from the ISP - if you're hosting a website or Mail, then you will need this to be static and have the DNS record pointed to this presence. (Most ISPs will give you a static one if you say you want one.)

On the lan side, the server will act as the DHCP service for the clients connecting through the switch...

Dave
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BrughCommented:
Yea, it shoudl work the same, only use let your ISP's DHCP server issue you a PUBLIC address each time you establish connection with your router.

If you are using DSL< you want to make sure your Modem is in Bridged mode.

You can disable that second NIC on the server.


 - Brugh

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BrughConnect With a Mentor Commented:
ewe, i can't type.

Whether you have 4 NICs or 1 on your server, as long as you have a router the only Public IP address you have to worry about should be assigned to the External INterface of your Router.

Everything else shoudl have an INternal IP and a Default Gateway mathcing the IP address of the Internal INterface of the Router.

Maybe that's a bit more clear.  hehe

 - Brugh





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Bert2005Author Commented:
Thanks guys. With that configuration, would you be able to use Exchance Server.

Plus, I agree that you don't need the other NIC if you aren't going to use ISA, correct? Just makes things more complicated.

Of course, my only othe question is if you have a switch, with my configuratin with a static IP from the ISP which doesn't really affect my question, it goes Modem -> router -> switch -> with all Cat6 cables and server's Cat6 cable connected to the switch and then server providing DHCP.

With the two NICs, would it goes modem -> router -> Internet NIC of server --> thorugh to LAN NIC then to switch?

I have static IP mainly for VPN to hospital.

Thanks.
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davidwainwrightCommented:
Hi

There should be no need to pass through the LAN NIC to the 'WAN' NIC...

I'd go for:

ISP (Static IP)------->Router------->Switch-------->Server (NIC 1)
                                                            I
                                                   LAN HOSTS


or:

ISP (Static IP)------->Router------->Switch--------->(NIC 1)-Server (as ISA)
                                                                                                 I
                                                                                             (NIC 2)
                                                                                                 I
                                                                                         LAN HOSTS

Hope this helps,

Dave
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Bert2005Author Commented:
This is what I had suggested. Nice diagram.

Certainly, there is a lot of controversy in regard to whether the router adds an extra layer of protection or an extra layer of complexity in diagram two. Certainly the ISA is much better.
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davidwainwrightCommented:
Assuming you have a firewall between yourself and the outside world that can act as a NAT server, and that you don't have multiple segments on the internal side of the LAN, then there isn't much (if any??) benefit to the router...
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