Reducing Broadcast Packets On A Point-To-Point Connection

My company is getting ready to implement a Point-to-Point connection (dedicated T-1's) to connect our home office with a remote office.  Since this connection is basically a direct extension of our LAN, which is what we are trying to accomplish.  During testing, we noticed a lot of broadcast traffic being sent by our switches through the Point-to-Point connection.

I am wondering if the best way to eliminate this broadcast traffic is to use a Layer 3 swtich at the head end connection on the point-to-point?  Any thoughts?
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rrmdesignAsked:
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
Thanks.

Then as pseudocyber mentioned, a layer 3 switch will stop the broadcasts. However, you will need to create a different IP network at one of the locations.

Assuming that whatever device you are using for a bridge can also route, you may as well enable routing on those devices and use them as routers.

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pseudocyberCommented:
Yes.  Routers do exactly that.  
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
Unless you're using a bridge, then you've already got a layer 3 device (a router) between the LAN and the T-1. A layer 3 switch won't accomplish much.

 Do you know for a fact that the broadcast traffic was crossing the T-1?
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rrmdesignAuthor Commented:
It was lighting up the activity lights on the WAN port of the IAD in place.  
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pseudocyberCommented:
Well, I meant that the layer 3 switch effectively has a router built into it - a routing process.

So, do you have the SAME IP net on both sides or different IP nets?  Same=Bridged, Different = Routed.
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rrmdesignAuthor Commented:
We are using the same IP network on both ends, no duplicates.  
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pseudocyberCommented:
So, you're bridging.  If you created a different net on one side, and used your layer 3 switch to seperate the two, then you could stop your broadcasts, both layer 2 and 3 at the border.
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
>We are using the same IP network on both ends, no duplicates.  

Just to clarify; Are the IP addresses of the devices at the home office and the remote office on the same IP network? Or when you say "same IP network on both ends", are you referring to only the T-1?
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rrmdesignAuthor Commented:
The remote location and home location are both on the same subnet of addresses for all devices on both networks.
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