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Ehternet Cable Creation (Straight Through and Cross Over)

Hi friends !

I know about the basic and easy concept of cable creation. When creating Straight Through/Cross Over cables, there is a industry standard pattern&

Straight Through Cable

White Green      ----------------------  White Green            1--------1
Green      ----------------------  Green                  2--------2
White Orange---------------------- White Orange            3--------3
Blue      ---------------------- Blue                  4--------4
White Blue      ---------------------- White Blue            5--------5
Orange      ---------------------- Orange                  6--------6
White Brown      ---------------------- White Brown            7--------7
Brown      ---------------------- Brown                  8--------8

Cross Over Cable

White Green      ----------------------      White Orange            1--------3
Green      ----------------------      Orange                  2--------6      
White Orange----------------------      White Green                                 3--------1
Blue      ----------------------      Blue                  4--------4
White Blue      ----------------------      White Blue                                 5--------5      
Orange      ----------------------      Green                  6--------2
White Brown      ----------------------      White Brown                                 7--------7
Brown      ----------------------      Brown                  8--------8

I know about this pattern and I use the same pattern when creating cables. BUT&

Sometimes I dont use this color pattern and I just take a simple memorable pattern like this one&(for straight through)

White Green      ----------------------      White Green
Green      ----------------------      Green
White Orange----------------------      White Orange
Orange      ----------------------      Orange
White Blue      ----------------------      White Blue
Blue      ---------------------      Blue
White Brown      ----------------------      White Brown
Brown      ----------------------      Brown

And when I create cross over, I just replace 1 to 3 and 2 to 6. With cable tester, I find that the cable is OK.

I want to know&WHETHER IT IS COMPULSARY TO USE THE INDUSTARY STANDARD COLOR PATTERN OR I CAN USE MY OWN PATTERN&

I want to know that when I use a switch and connect PCs to switch using cables with industry standard color pattern then they ping and communicate with each other...and to the same switch, I connect a PC using cable with my own color pattern then some times it works and sometimes it doesnt (It shows that it is connected with 100 Mbps bandwidth but it cant access internet while others can through Proxy Server and I have given all proper proxy settings to it as well as to others).

I want to know&WHETHER IT IS COMPULSARY TO USE THE INDUSTARY STANDARD COLOR PATTERN OR I CAN USE MY OWN PATTERN&

I ALSO WANT TO KNOW WHETER I WILL HAVE TO USE THE SAME COLOR PATTERN FOR ALL THE CABLES WHICH ARE CONNECTED TO THE SWITCH OR I CAN USE DIFFERENT COLOR PATTERNS FOR THE CABLES&???

Please reply in this regard.

I will be highly thankful to you.

Thanks&

Hemant
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JatinHemant
Asked:
JatinHemant
5 Solutions
 
Bart-De-BalCommented:
It is better to use the industry standard color pattern. This is so because the wires with the same colors are twisted by pair. UTP = Unshielded Twisted Pair
Thos cables are twisted to limit noise problems and induction problems.
Induction problems occur when two wires are close to each other, some of the current from the one wire is transmitted to another wire by means of induction.
So it is very important to use the standard color pattern for very long cables. For small cables it is not that important but it could have an influence on the performance of the cable.
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jburgaardCommented:
Agree.
You should use standards.
The reason is : if you were only transmitting DC then no dif. But you are transmitting high freq. AC.
The wires in the cables are twisted in an advanced way so there will be a minimum crosstalk if you connect to standards.
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JatinHemantAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your reply...

So tell me whether I am using the right standard color pattern as I have told you that I usually use the industry standard color pattern...

Straight Through Cable

White Green      ----------------------  White Green            1--------1
Green      ----------------------  Green                  2--------2
White Orange---------------------- White Orange            3--------3
Blue      ---------------------- Blue                  4--------4
White Blue      ---------------------- White Blue            5--------5
Orange      ---------------------- Orange                  6--------6
White Brown      ---------------------- White Brown            7--------7
Brown      ---------------------- Brown                  8--------8

Cross Over Cable

White Green      ----------------------      White Orange            1--------3
Green      ----------------------      Orange                  2--------6      
White Orange----------------------      White Green                                 3--------1
Blue      ----------------------      Blue                  4--------4
White Blue      ----------------------      White Blue                                 5--------5      
Orange      ----------------------      Green                  6--------2
White Brown      ----------------------      White Brown                                 7--------7
Brown      ----------------------      Brown                  8--------8
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JatinHemantAuthor Commented:
sorry for incomplete reply...

Please tell me whether I am using the right industary standard color pattern or not ?

Thanks...

Hemant
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Bart-De-BalCommented:
I use the following:

Orange-White
Orange
Green-White
Blue
Blue-White
Green
Brown-White
Brown

Orange-White     - Green-White
Orange               - Green
Green-White      - Orange-White
Blue                   - Blue
Blue-White         - Blue-White  
Green                 - Orange      
Brown-White     - Brown-White
Brown               - Brown

Is it really necessary to create your own cables ? Sometimes it is better to by cables with the correct length.
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ElrondCTCommented:
The prewired cables that I have use the same color scheme that Bart-De-Bal lists. I know I've seen two standard setups, A & B, marked on jacks when I'm running my own cables through walls. I don't have any jacks at hand to check their standard colors, but I think the B set is the same as Bart-De-Bal lists. Another reason for using the standard wiring scheme, besides the fact mentioned that it limits crosstalk, is that you then can finish off a cable with a jack on one end and use the colors premarked on the jack, which can be less confusing because sometimes the jacks put the wires in different locations, but they'll be color-coded consistently to match with the pins.

I second the recommendation to use prewired cables whenever possible. Don't buy them at a place like Staples if you can avoid it, though; they charge way too much. Online, I get cables up to 7' for less than a dollar each. My time is worth more than that. About the only time I make my own is when I'm connecting to a jack, or I need a really long cable (over 100', beyond which standard sizes for finished cables tend to be harder to fit to the job at hand). I buy a bunch at a time of different lengths so I'm not killed by shipping costs; they're so much cheaper than buying locally at retail that having a few extra is well worth it.
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
There are 2 standards EIA/TIA568A and EIA/TIA568B. Both are very acceptable, but you must be consistent and use the same through out. A 568A on one end of a cable, and a 568B on the other, is a cross-over cable. For the record in the US 568B is more common due to AT&T setting the pace.
You shouldn't really make your own cables as they are very fussy as to the quality of terminations. If you do they should be tested and certified with meters running in excess of $5000.
However following site will show you how to assemble and color codes.
http://mia.ece.uic.edu/~papers/etc/msg00033.html
Good site to read for do's and don'ts:
http://www.lanshack.com/cat5e-tutorial.aspx
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