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/usr/adm/messages has been deleted

Posted on 2007-08-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-05
OS = SCO Openserver 5.0.5

Let me start off by saying that I know very little about SCO. I have reason to believe that the systems administrator that worked on this system before me deleted /usr/adm/messages. I'm sure that there is an easy fix but it eludes me. Any help here would be much appreciated.

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Question by:ronayers
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Expert Comment

by:Kent Olsen
ID: 19624182
Hi Ron,

I'm not an SCO person, but I've got a couple of ideas.

Does the kernel (or one of the daemons) automatically create the file at boot?  If so, a boot may solve it.

If not, boot in single user mode, and create the file

  touch /usr/adm/messages
  chmod 755 /usr/adm/messages

I'm just guessing at the permissions but that seems reasonable.


Good Luck,
Kent
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Expert Comment

by:burrcm
ID: 19625061
messages doesn't actually live at that location. This reference is a link shown by the filename being displayed thus - messages@. Permissions are 644. To locate the actual file, log in as root and from / type find . -name messages -print. I see the actual item here -
./var/opt/K/SCO/Unix/5.0.7Hw/usr/adm/messages
Now, I was shown how to create such a link years ago, but I cannot recall the process. I have manuals in the office. I will see if I can work it out, but it is Friday night here, I will be in the office Monday.

I am assuming that the real file still exists and just the link is broken. I suspect you would be seeing errors if this were not the case.

Chris B
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Expert Comment

by:burrcm
ID: 19629857
The command is ln (LN=Link). Found the SCO help entry  here - http://osr600doc.sco.com/en/man/html.C/ln.C.html
If you need anything else, post back.

Chris B
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Accepted Solution

by:
Hanno P.S. earned 500 total points
ID: 19668470
Before linking the file, make sure it's really (!) the actual messages file you want to use.

In more recent Unix variants, this file lives in /var/adm/messages. Only very old variants have it in /usr/adm/messages.

# ln -s /var/opt/K/SCO/Unix/5.0.7Hw/usr/adm/messages /usr/adm/messages
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Expert Comment

by:burrcm
ID: 19668733
Version in question is 5.05, older than mine, so the path I listed won't match exactly. ./var/opt/K/SCO/Unix/5.0.5Hw/usr/adm/messages may be correct, but the find command will clarify.

Chris B
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