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Recovering lost VB.Net code

While I sware I was saving my work constantly I came in today and it seems like my code from last Friday is lost.  I dont know how it happened.  However, right befire I left on Friday I was testing and I built the project.  I have the .exe file and PDB.  Using this, is it possible to get back to my source code?
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collages
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collages
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1 Solution
 
jpaulinoCommented:
I think thats impossible!
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Fernando SotoCommented:
Hi collages;

Download these software applications. You should be able to recover you code although you may have to do it one class at a time.

Reflector for .NET. It's free
    http://www.aisto.com/roeder/dotnet/ 

Reflector.FileDisassembler. A plug in for Reflector. Its free.
    http://www.denisbauer.com/NETTools/FileDisassembler.aspx 

Fernando
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DhaestCommented:
Take a look at http://www.aisto.com/roeder/dotnet/

With the Reflector for .NET  you can dissassembly your exe to recover your code.
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jpaulinoCommented:
Sorry guys! But it realy works from any exe file ?
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DhaestCommented:
If it's created with .net, I believe so.


The next essential tool is called .NET Reflector, which is a class browser and decompiler that can examine an assembly and show you just about all of its secrets. The .NET Framework introduced reflection which can be used to examine any .NET-based code, whether it is a single class or an entire assembly. Reflection can also be used to retrieve information about the various classes, methods, and properties included in a particular assembly. Using .NET Reflector, you can browse the classes and methods of an assembly, you can examine the Microsoft intermediate language (MSIL) generated by these classes and methods, and you can decompile the classes and methods and see the equivalent in C# or Visual BasicĀ® .NET.

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jpaulinoCommented:
I already heard about .NET Reflector but I thought that you need to have installed to then check all the changes that we've made. Not that way.

I have to look better. :-)
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Fernando SotoCommented:
Reflector for .Net will take a compiled file in MSIL and the pdb file and recreates the program from the information.
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collagesAuthor Commented:
Wow...thanks a bunch.  Thats exactly what I needed!!!!!!
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Fernando SotoCommented:
Not a problem, glad to help. ;=)
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collagesAuthor Commented:
Just got it all back, compiled, and it runs just like it did before.  Thanks again!!
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Fernando SotoCommented:
That is great. I am glad it worked out for you. ;=)
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