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Home Network, computer access gone

I've got a home network with a Dell 8200, 2350 and D620, with XP Pro, Home, Pro respectively.  They were all able to exchange files until I replaced my wire router with a wireless router (that was a node, now it's the main router).  

Now the D620 "sees" the 8200 in its MS Network list, but can't access it (and gives the "is not accessible, you may not have permission / the network path was not found" error).  The 8200 doesn't "see" the D620 in its MS Network list.   But they both see the 2350 and can exchange files with it.

The only significant change that I know I made is that the main router used to be 192.168.1.1 and the wireless router 192.168.1.2, and I changed the wireless router to 192.168.1.1 (and removed the other one).   All computers access the internet OK through the wireless router.

I need a list of things to try and look at to fix this.   The 8200 has Norton Internet Security, as does the D620.   Again, they were exchanging files fine until I changed the router.

Any suggestions on this would be appreciated.

Thanks!
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codequest
Asked:
codequest
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2 Solutions
 
Chris GralikeSpecialistCommented:
You sure you are not blocking things like SMB (Server Message Blocks) / CIFS?
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codequestAuthor Commented:
thnx for input....not sure what those mean, and where I would unblock.  

FYI/BTW, the 2350 is hooked in via the wireless, and the 8200 and D620 are directly connected to the router.
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Chris GralikeSpecialistCommented:
Thats strange, that is. when i intepret it right.

So your saying the following

       D620        8200
          \              /
            \Router/-------------wan
                ..||..
            ..............
               2350

Now the d620 / 8200 can see but not access
2350 can exchange in all directions with the d62 and the 2800

One no-brainer here, are they in the same subnet?
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codequestAuthor Commented:
that's the correct model.  Again, I'm not sure what is a subnet...I'm looking at the router settings and I recall that I reset it to use as the main router, and didn't change much except PPoE ISP access user id and password, and the wireless security setup ...it's a Linksys WRT54GS.

I pulled the cable on the D620 to see what it would do on wireless, and now it can't see the 8200.

I've had this condition before, but why and what I did about it is lost in the past.  It's been stable for at least a year, until I swapped routers today.
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Chris GralikeSpecialistCommented:
im off to bed, as a list you might want to try

(remove the wan plug for a sec)
" Disable the windows Firewall and check again
" Disable any virus scanner (some have port blocking rules)
" Try to sniff the traffic on a box that isnt working to see what happens on the wire (advanced)
" Make sure you keep flat subnets ie. class C with different IPs so there is actually something to route.
" Stop before you get mad, and think things over regularly (keep your head cool) :P

Im off to bed,...

Regards ;-)
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codequestAuthor Commented:
Maybe something in the firewalls, like Norton on the 8200 interprets the "new" router in  a different way.
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codequestAuthor Commented:
Ok, thanks!
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Chris GralikeSpecialistCommented:
Subnet is the following,
ps just in time :P

IP : 10.0.0.x  Subnet 255.255.255.0
This means that all machines that use these addresses are in the 192.168.0 network. Wat you want to do is make sure the wireless part of the router is in a different network. ie.

Wired use:
IP : 10.0.0.x      (router default 10.0.0.135 if im not mistaken)
Subnet : 255.255.255.0
Gateway : [IP of the router on the wire 10.0.0.135 in my example]

Wireless use:
IP : 10.1.0.x     (where the router will then be 10.1.0.135)
Subnet : 255.255.255.0
Gateway : [IP of the router on Wireless 10.1.0.135 in my example]

Because the IP addresses (network part) are different, the machine knows it is destined for the router to handle. If this doesnt work it is prob a misconfiguration in your Router.

ps. forget the sniffing part. Considering your anwser it is to advanced and will only confuse you...

Regards,
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Chris GralikeSpecialistCommented:
192.168.0 i meant 10.0.0 obviously...

I realy need to go to bed.. .:S
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codequestAuthor Commented:
So, I plugged the D620 back in, and it can see the 2350 and access shared files on it.  

The 2350 can see the 8200, and access shared files on it.

The 2350 cannot see the D620 (it could before).

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codequestAuthor Commented:
I checked ipconfig on all three computers...they're all on the same subnet and I've told Norton on the 8200 to trust the IP address of the D620...no change
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Chris GralikeSpecialistCommented:
well i think the last post answered it..
Unless the router is a "Access Point" instead of a wireless router. Make sure the 2350 is on a different network then the other two computers.
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codequestAuthor Commented:
Thanks for input.  I'm out of brain cells on this one....need to restart in AM.  It's got to be something relatively simple, and I'll take a closer look at your post above.
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Chris GralikeSpecialistCommented:
To express what i mean (using standard Class C addresses now)

 machine A                                 MachineB
192.168.0.10                              192.168.0.11
255.255.255.0                            255.255.255.0
192.168.0.1 <Gw                       192.168.0.1 <Gw
         |                                            |
         |                                            |
         |                                            |
         |---------192.168.0.1---------|  << Wired
         |.............192.168.1.1..........|  << Wireless
                           ||||
                  ......................
                       ..........
                    Machine C
                  192.168.1.10
                 255.255.255.0
                192.168.1.1<Gw

Regards,
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codequestAuthor Commented:
bzzt...sznkzap...brain cells popping like monitors on the bridge of the Enterprise...  the idea of multiple IP addresses for the computers is way over my head...  

I think I'm going to have to start with the ground up.   These little Linksys home networks can't be that complicated.  The WRT54 is designed to support wired and wireless users and little guys like me would be sprawled out all over the place if it were that complicated...

Thanks for the inputs, though...
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trucnhtCommented:
Back to the basic thing: Access rights and users

1. Make sure that 3 PCs have one common username and password. Each PC has:
       Username: User1
       Password: anything
2.  Each PC has: File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks (Start - Control Panel - Network Connections - Right click on Local Area Connection (network card) - Properties - In General tab). If not, click Install - Service
3. Temporary disable Firewall on all PCs. (Or Enable Firewall but add Exceptions on File and Printer Sharing.
4. Create C:\Shared on 3 PCs. Right click on the folder, Share and Security - Share this folder - lveave the default name (Shared). Click Permissions - Add - User1 (user create in step 1) - OK... to close
5. Make sure that 3 PCs on the same network (All are Worstation or Home or something like that) To check: Open Windows Explorer, Right click on My Computer - Properties - Computer Name - Make sure that ALL PCs has the same DOMAIN as WORKGROUP. If they are not the same, you have to click Change to change to the same workgroup name (should all be WORKSTATION or HOME). If you need to change the PC name, you will have to restart the PC.
6. Turn all PCs, any try to browse and log on to the other PC's share folder.

7. Make sure they can PING each other:
On each PC, say they have names and addresses like these:
PC2 - 192.168.1.2
PC3 - 192.168.1.3
PC1 - 192.168.1.4

On PC1:
a. Start - Run - cmd
b. ipconfig /all
    To see the IP address of the current PC. You should see
    IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.4
c. ping 192.168.1.3
    You should see:
    Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
d. ping 192.168.1.2
    You should see
    Reply from 192.168.1.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    This means that PC1 can comunicate with PC2 and PC3.
e. net use z: \\PC2\Shared
    net use y: \\PC3\Shared

Repeate step a to e for PC2 and PC3 and change the PC name, IP address to the other PCs.

Hope this will help.

Note: If you have some problem, I guest the problem is from XP HOME's Pc because I am not sure it can be networked.

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codequestAuthor Commented:
Thanks for input.   Apparently I have some credit with the networking continuum, because when I woke up this morning, the 8200 and the D620 both reported (from Norton) that Windows firewall had been turned on (they were off before) and asked did I want to use Norton instead.  I said "yes" and voila, the problem went away.   For some reason apparently the change in routers caused the 8200 and D620 to turn on windows firewall (gak!) which I should have checked, and that was all it took.   Thanks though for the helpful inputs...there are so many ways for home networking to go off the rails every time it happens I just shudder and I'm always grateful for EE as a source of ideas to keep me looking for the solution.
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