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How may DC are needed to setup a single domain in AD

How many domain controlliers are needed to effectivly support a single widows 2003 domain
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mamidei
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mamidei
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Tony MassaCommented:
Two.  In Case of failure.  You could use one, technically
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Toni UranjekConsultant/TrainerCommented:
Hi!

It depends on number of users and physical locations. But minimum number is two, for redundancy purposes.

HTH

Toni
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davidriversCommented:
You can only have 1 Domain Controller (DC), you can have other back up controllers should your Primary Domain Controller (PDC) fall over.

I would look at using Windows Small Business Server as your PDC, it will happily support around 100 employees
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Bird DogCommented:
Only one is needed for the purpose of a small domain. It is better to have a second domain controller to stop down time. But if your are considering running major aps you should set up to for a better load balancing. Also with 2003 server their actually no PDC's anymore their are only domain controllers
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ocon827679Commented:
Toni is on the mark here.  It all depends on your environment, the number of users, the number of sites, and AD-aware applications, such as Exchange, etc.  You're better off going out to the the technet site and looking at the AD planning white papers to help you make your determination.
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Ron MalmsteadInformation Services ManagerCommented:
1 is required.  Two is provides redundancy.

for small domains you may consider using SBS 2003 (small business server) which is a Active directory domain/exchange server/webserver/print server..."all-in-one"
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kmotawehCommented:
two is the most dependable practice , see the best pratcice from microsoft


http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/profwin/pw0302.mspx
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Ron MalmsteadInformation Services ManagerCommented:
Everyone....  

IT DEPENDS on the size of your network.  You don't need two DC's for 5 client machines....doesn't make sense.  In that case you would likely use SBS which is a domain in a box...and "EFFECTIVELY" would support a small network..
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Tony MassaCommented:
Thanks for the clarification.  That's what everyone said.  If you want to run a *REAL* business, you better have a recovery plan.

Is it easier to spend a couple days of your time and lost business recovering a failed/corrupt directory, or having two servers?  That's up to the business to decide what risk they're willing to take.  If I hired a tech guy to manage my business and he recommended a single DC, I'd fire him on the spot.  

The author did not mention any specific size or number of users...so he got the generic answer.  The active directory database can "scale from small installations with a few objects, to large installations containing millions of objects"  <-- From Microsoft

-TM
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ChiefITCommented:
That's kind of a loaded question.

We don't know how many users, computers, storage devices, switches and routers you will be using
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mamideiAuthor Commented:
I know there is a formula as you add child domains to forests, does anyone know this calculation? Example 2 domains, recommands 5 DC's, etc....
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Toni UranjekConsultant/TrainerCommented:
There is no such formula. But you should have (as already explained above) at leatst two DCs for each domain. More domain controllers are needed, if you have more physical locations. The number of additional domain controllers depends on the number of sites. The only "rule" that exists is not to have gobal catalog on domain controller which holds Infrastructure Master role in multiple domain environment.
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ChiefITCommented:
No formula, just recommend two per domain
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