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Connecting two networks LAN/WAN, why do we need a Router?Can we solve it with a bridge

Connecting two networks LAN/WAN, why do we need a Router.
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sidhunan
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sidhunan
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rsivanandanCommented:
Router -> Connects 2 networks which are on 2 different ip subnets

Bridge -> Connects 2 networks which are on 2 networks with same ip range

Hope that helps.

Cheers,
Rajesh
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computerfixinsCommented:
some not so pretty graphics to the above:



Computer room
internet -------------- <public ip  24.22.40.1 | router | private ip 192.168.115.1> ---------------<192.168.15.2 my computer>


Living room
<192.168.15.3 wirless bridge connected to above network's router>--------------------<192.168.15.4 my xbox360)
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computerfixinsCommented:
Basic use of a home router is to enable mutiple computers share one WAN ip, also a good measure of security in being behind a router.
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rsivanandanCommented:
:-) A slight disagreement, NAT should never be considered for security. It is one of the mechanisms but definitely not designed for security in mind.

Cheers,
Rajesh
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pseudocyberCommented:
Bridges were intended to be used with very old WAN networks.  Routers replaced them.  If you connect two layer 2 networks over a high latency bridge, your broadcast traffic flows across the high latency WAN connection to the other side - this either causes needless traffic across your WAN link, or it can needlessly create considerable lag in the performance of your network based applications.

Rotuers block broadcasts - tightening the "diameter" of your network.
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computerfixinsCommented:
Bah. put two windows xp computers on the network with no service packs, one in a dmz zone with a public ip and one behind a nat...  Let me know which one goes down first... o.O

Not to mention most routers come packaged with some kind of minimal firewalls.



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pseudocyberCommented:
It's not NAT which protects the devices - it's the device not forwarding ports unless explictly configured to do so which protects the devices.  So, it's sort of like a firewall - albeit not a stateful one.
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