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Can I stop Exchange 2003 from over-riding outlook mail default settings?

Hi everyone,
We are have installed MS SBS 2003.  We want to use exchange for everything it is set up to do except for email - as we have POP accounts at another place.  Exchange keeps wanting to set our default email account to EXCHANGE even after we reset outlook to our preferred default POP account.  Is there a setting in Exchange we should look at so that it will stop over-riding our outlook POP accounts default?  Any help on this is greatly appreciated!
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eddie_madrigal
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eddie_madrigal
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1 Solution
 
czcdctCommented:
So uninstall Exchange from the SBS server?
Either that or stop all the Exchange services.
In addition to that you don't actually need to configure your clients for Exchange, although I accept that one of those SBS client-side setup things is probably playing games here.
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SembeeCommented:
That is what SBS does. It is designed to be self maintaining, which including configuring Outlook to use Exchange for all email.
Any reason you don't want to use Exchange for email? It is so much better than any POP3 service that you may be using now.

Simon.
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czcdctCommented:
So can we help the guy pull the relevant bits out of the GPO or wherever the heck it sticks itself?
Whilst the POP3 service is undoubtedly a pain in the rear and probably solvable by the POP3 connector the guy might not be able to wrest the business away from it.
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SembeeCommented:
The question has come up a number of times, here and elsewhere and I have never seen it answered in a way that I can replicate or point to. Everyone seems to say "thats what SBS does". I don't think it is GPO, I suspect it is a PRF file, wrapped up in everything else that SBS pushes down to the client. We all know how difficult it is trying to unpick what SBS does without causing more problems.

Simon.
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eddie_madrigalAuthor Commented:
We want to have a centrally stored location for our contacts, email (both sent and received) so that if we go from one computer to another, we have that info available.  If we do away with Exchange, we lose the ability to get at this info globally, right?  We started with a basic workgroup and eventually decided to go Server based - security, sharing, etc.  The SBS we are using is in it's second month of trial and everything is going well - except for this Exchange ... We will also want remote access to the global folders, etc.
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czcdctCommented:
Err no. If you go with Exchange you can work on practically any PC on the planet and have access to all your email, contacts, calendaring and tasks from either your laptop if you take it around or from a browser in the Ulan Bator Hilton if you want.
Getting rid of your POP3 solution can only enhance your experience.
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eddie_madrigalAuthor Commented:
So if I get rid of the POP, what would the steps be ??? -

1. Set up Exchange to handle xy.com email
2. Tell the ISP to map the static ip to the xy.com email domain name
3. Cancel curent POP service

What happens to mail being sent to recipients while all this is going on?  Should I count on putting a cot in place for Labor Day Weekend and hope to have everything resolved by Tuesday?
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jonnietexasCommented:
Actually, the answer was yes, if you do away with exchange you are losing the ability to meet your requirements unless you change OS'es to linux or other (which if you're not familiar with them will be its own nightmare).  Though I agree with your points czcdct.  The right thing to do here is use Exchange fully.  Otherwise you're unnecessarilly complicating your environment.  As far as business concerns, I don't think that many businesses could justify using POP.  No backup, no roaming emails (unless you do that leave the message on the server thing - and why do that??)

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SembeeCommented:
The switch to using Exchange for email is quite easy.
You need a static IP address first. Once you have that, ask whoever is responsible for your domain to configure a new host in that domain pointing to your static IP address.
For example the new host is mail, creating mail.domain.com.
Then ask your ISP to configure a reverse DNS address on your IP address for mail.domain.com

You will then need to wait 48 hours for that to propagate.

When you are ready to switch, open port 25 on your firewall inbound.
Then ask whoever looks after your domain name to change the MX records to point to mail.domain.com.
Continue to collect email from the POP3 accounts as normal, for at least 48 hours after making the change.

That is of course presuming that Exchange has been configured correctly for your public domain name. If it hasn't, run the wizard in SBS again.

After three or four days no new email should be coming in on the POP3 accounts and you can close that service.

Simon.
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