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Windows 2003 Server Setup

Hi There,

I have a Pentium 3 Gateway that I am trying to setup as a sever in my home.  

I will give you some basics topology of how my network is setup.
From the outside of the house comes a cable that plugs into the Verizon DSL modem.  From there it runs into port one on my 24 link sys gigabyte switch, which is an up link port.  I have the sever plugged into port 2, desktop plugged into port 3, link sys router Access Point plugged into port 4, and finally another desktop plugged into port 5.

I have windows xp pro on all the machines.  Windows server 2003 standard is on the server.  I have set the server up as a Domain Controller and DNS.

However, the verizon modem handles DNS and DHCP also. Which are turned on. As for the Link sys router I have everything turned off on that except for the access point which forwards all requests to port 1 for the internet.  

The problem that i am having is that I cannot get any machine to recognize the domain and the domain will not connect to the outside world aka the internet.

The whole point of this is to use active directory so I can use roaming profiles and such.

Any ideas on what is wrong?
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TSCAT
Asked:
TSCAT
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1 Solution
 
Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
All the workstations need to have the Server as their primary DNS server. (leave the secondary blank unless you ever want to turn off the server but still browse the Internet from a workstation)

On the server make sure the DNS service is installed and working and configured to forward DNS requests to the DSL modem. Scroll down to step 3 http://www.petri.co.il/how_to_install_active_directory_on_windows_2003.htm
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EntityPacketCommented:
Is your 24 port linksys switch a smart switch, where you can see if your able to ping the Internet from there? Most ISPs make you used a cloned MAC address to fool the modem. Where/How are you doing that?
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TSCATAuthor Commented:
The 24 port switch is not a smart switch. It is only a regular switch and I cannot program it either.
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TSCATAuthor Commented:
I also would like to know how to find the DNS address for the verizon modem. When I log into the modem it does not show me the DNS Server Address at all...

Any ideas
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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
Well the Verizon modems (and most other SOHO modems) act as DNS proxies but usually on the status page for the WAN it will list the DNS servers it uses.

Can you post the model and then I might be able to give you specific steps?

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MRR045Commented:
You should be able to open the cmd window and type in ipconfig /all That should give you the DNS provider IP number. (it does on mine but I have AT&T.)
As stated above, type in the static IP of your AD/DNS server on your workstations. I would switch to static IP's on your workstations and have your AD server doing DHCP/Static IP's instead of the router. Again, that is what I had to do at home on my network.
Mike
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TSCATAuthor Commented:
I am going to go ahead and try some of the solutions listed, I will let you know if any work tonite!

Thanks!

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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
OK, let us know how it turns out.

BTW - if you have a Westell modem (I know Verizon uses them) then from the homepage click Status>Connection Summary
e.g. -> http://192.168.1.1/advstat.htm 
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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
Oh, and the above is for finding the IP of Verizon's DNS servers.
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ChiefITCommented:
From the outside of the house comes a cable that plugs into the Verizon DSL modem.  From there it runs into port one on my 24 link sys gigabyte switch, which is an up link port.  I have the sever plugged into port 2, desktop plugged into port 3, link sys router Access Point plugged into port 4, and finally another desktop plugged into port 5.


Your topology is wrong:
It should go
DSL Modem>>WAN side of Router/ LAN side of router>>Uplink of switch/ports on the switch>>clients and server.

Make sure you have no crossover cables.

Linksys Giga switches are smart switches.
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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
ChiefIT, it seems like I'm dogging your steps ;)

I'm going to disagree with you on your topology. The way TSCAT has things setup should work. The DSL modem also performs routing, firewall, and NAT.

In the configuration you listed there would either be NAT performed twice or you would need to disable it on the Linksys and configure the DSL modem to route to the subnet connected to the Linksys. Also, if you need to have port forwarding, you may or may not be able to forward to the subnet connected to the Linksys because of the limited functionality that a SOHO device offers.
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JSoupCommented:
I agree with ChiefIT:
Your topology is wrong:
It should go
DSL Modem>>WAN side of Router/ LAN side of router>>Uplink of switch/ports on the switch>>clients and server.


 
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ChiefITCommented:
My_username:

I spent six years in the Marines. If I can't take a constructive comment, no one can. :'} I am here to help folks. So, I have no problems with folks spitting out what they are thinking.

You might know of some new hardware I am not familiar with. That's why I like your input.  I am not familiar with a modem that can do the NAT and Firewall. The DSL modems I know are just modems. Hardware firewall/ NAT is the router's job. Unless things have changed since working in the phone company, I think the router should come directly after the DSL modem.
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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
I understand where you're coming from. That's why I put in what these SOHO modems do. I've setup several home networks for friends, etc.

If TSCAT wasn't setting this up in his home then I'd say your setup would be correct.

Here's a sample of what Verizon is giving to customers:
Quickstart Guide (700kb)
http://onlinehelp.verizon.net/consumer/bin/pdf/VersaLink327WGatewayQuickStartGuide.pdf

User Manual (10mb)
http://onlinehelp.verizon.net/consumer/bin/pdf/VersaLink327WGatewayUserGuide.pdf
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JSoupCommented:
TSCAT
Can you please update use on the problem you are still having?
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MRR045Commented:
I thought it looked like he was having a basic DNS/Active Directory issue. It doesn't matter what device he as where as long as he has his AD/DNS server pointed to the right device. I would turn off DHCP on the router and put in static reservations on the 2003 server and go from there.
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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
"I thought it looked like he was having a basic DNS/Active Directory issue."

I agree. But I don't think switching to static IP addresses is necessary. A correctly configured DHCP server and a forwarder on the DNS server should, I believe, clear up the issues.
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MRR045Commented:
I agree but it in a small network for troubleshooting purposes, it might be helpful until he figures it all out.
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