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Slow network browse

I have a Windows 2003 network and when I am using policy and mapping a drive the computer runs very slow (even after logon)  If I logon as the admin then it runs fine (admin is also part of the DOMAIN) I have having trouble browsing the network because it is so slow...any idea what might cause this???
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mrmclaughlin
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mrmclaughlin
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JSoupCommented:
USing Win 98????
or
XP
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mrmclaughlinAuthor Commented:
XP on the workstation and server 2003 using group policy
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JSoupCommented:
Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP. Tech level change <<<
Ref http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/library/e1cc4f8c-04f5-4b98-a04c-1ba601fb5d421033.mspx?mfr=true
 
What Is Computer Browser Service?
Computer Browser service is the mechanism that collects and distributes the list of workgroups and domains and the servers within them. The list displays in the Microsoft Windows Network window and related windows in My Network Places.

Microsoft Active Directory services in Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP create a searchable list of computers and resources that is separate from the list of domains, workgroups, and servers in My Network Places. Computer Browser service provides backward compatibility with computers running earlier versions of Windows that must use Network Basic Input/Output System (NetBIOS) over TCP/IP (NetBT) and are not Active Directorycapable.

For the detail look at How Computer Browser Service Works 2003 version
http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/library/e1cc4f8c-04f5-4b98-a04c-1ba601fb5d421033.mspx?mfr=true
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JSoupCommented:
Please also see  as real remote posablity to your issuse.  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/318030/en-us  You cannot access shared files and folders or browse computers in the workgroup
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mrmclaughlinAuthor Commented:
I guess I am not clear...I mean I have a drive mapped to a NAS on the network and when this user is logged in and try to open that drive it takes forever, but eventually sees it...however if I log on as the administrator it opens rather fast...what could be causing this
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JSoupCommented:
Consumer  NAS devices are slow compared to modern desktop PC's, even when you spend $1000 or so (because of their low-speed embedded electronics), so it's not at all surprising.
Other then Admin of the NAS device, user Access Permissions are not Cached. They need to verify each access.   Once you  Map a share is it note to bad.
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JSoupCommented:
my figger are gitting sore..
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JSoupCommented:
Consumer  NAS devices are slow compared to modern desktop PC's, even when you spend $1000 or so (because of their low-speed embedded electronics), so it's not at all surprising.
Other then Admin of the NAS device, user Access Permissions are not Cached. They need to verify each access.   Once you  Map a share is it note to bad.
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JSoupCommented:
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