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Changing Drive Letter from I: to C:

Hi,

I have all programs and stuff on the I: drive. Some software won't work unless drive C: is present on the system. I tried to create a logical C: drive which would substitute to the physical I: drive.

I opened a command prompt and the entered the command : SUBST C: I:\

But when I hit enter, I get the following error:

Invalid parameter - C:

How can I change it from the I: drive to the C: drive?  Would I have to re-install Windows again?

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fcruz5
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fcruz5
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1 Solution
 
tcicatelliCommented:
Try creating a new share of \\computer\c$ and assigning it a drive letter of c:.
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tcicatelliCommented:
Sorry, that' a new share of \\computer\I$.  You would need to reinstall windows otherwise because all the registry keys are mapped to the I drive.
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and235100Commented:
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phototropicCommented:
Does the computer boot Windows from a drive called "I"?   If that is the case, there is not much alternative to reinstalling Windows.  There is a Microsoft fix that is supposed to allow you to reassign the boot drive letter:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/223188

I have never managed to make this proceedure work - whenever I have tried it, I have ended up with a non-booting computer.  There are lots of good reasons for calling your boot drive "C" , and very few good reasons to call it anything else...
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KromptonCommented:
If you have a large enough spare drive you could try a drive cloning app. There are some freeware ones out there. I personally use Acronis True Image. Make a backup image then using the restore partition allows you to make the restored partition Active and assign it a drive letter. I have never tried restoring an image of the boot partition to a different drive letter though.
I concur with phototropic that there are few, if any, good reasons for installing Windows to a drive letter other than C though most programs use the environment variable %systemdrive% which will be whever you installed Windows there are always those old or poorly written apps that hard code C:
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nobusCommented:
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and235100Commented:
This is not a recommended procedure - as tcicatelli suggests - reinstall windows from scratch - otherwise you may hit bigger issues down the line.
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phototropicCommented:
nobus,

Have you successfully applied this proceedure?  I have tried it twice, and both times, as I said above, I got a non-booting pc.  Other techs I have spoken to have reported the same thing...

fcruz5,

You should be aware that the Microsoft Kb article referenced above is not tried and tested...

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nobusCommented:
no i was lucky enough not to need it
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Davis McCarnOwnerCommented:
OK....
1) Windows wound up on "I" because your system has one of the 7(or9)-in-1 memory card readers AND the bios is set to support USB devices for booting.  C,D,E,F,G, and H were taken when Windows got installed (yuck, huh?)
2) All of the links in the Windows registry are now to "I" and, even if you forced it back to C somehow, it wouldn't boot.
3) To fix it, disable the USB boot option in the Bios or unplug the USB cable from the reader and start from scratch.
Talk about a pain in the.....
One alternative.  Use Disk Management to change the drive letters for the memory slots (try M,N,O,P,...).  Then get a USB flashdrive, use Disk Management to set it as C, and then You'll be able to install the software.
I, BTW, have seen both problems; redid a computer from scratch and found Windoze to be on the G drive (mutter, mutter) and, had a guy call from Seattle who couldn't install the HP printer drivers because they were hard coded to unzip to "C".  What's funny is that it was an HP computer I had the problem with and the one he had in Seattle.  (tongue in cheek) I guess the HP computer guys are mad at the printer folks?
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