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How to Migrate Windows 2000 Advanced Server to Windows 2003 Standard Server

I want to upgrade my domain to AD 2003, but since i know an inplace upgrade from Windows 2000 Advanced Server to Windows 2003 Standard is not allowed, what would be the best steps to follow to upgrade my architecture? The End result should be to run Windows 2003 native in the same box as Windows 2000 Advanced server is running as we speak.
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jydrach
Asked:
jydrach
1 Solution
 
Luke92881Commented:
Install 2000 server on another PC... Transfer roles to it, replicate. Demote current DC, install 2K3 on it, Run Adprep, promote it, Transfer roles to it, Demote temp server.

I would suggest not using the same name/IP address after installing 2K3 but you can as long as you clean everything up nicely ahead of time.

Just make sure all your Information is there before demoting the current one.
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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
And be sure to run a full backup before starting. ;)
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Brian PiercePhotographerCommented:
A slightly different approach:-

Install Windows 2003 on the new machine

Assign the new computer an IP address and subnet mask on the existing network
Make sure that the preferred DNS server on new machine points to the existing DNS Server on the Domain (normally the existing domain controller)

Join the new machine to the existing domain as a member server

Put the Windows 2003 CD in the Win2000 Server and run
AdPrep /forestprep
Adprep /domainprep
from the i386 folder on the CD

(If the new Windows 2003 server is the R2 you need to run Adprep the \CMPNENTS\R2\ folder on CD2, not the one in the i386 foler)

Remove the CD from the Win2000 machine

On the 2003 machine, from the command line promote the new machine to a domain controller with the DCPROMO command from the command line Select Additional Domain Controller in an existing Domain

Once Active Directory is installed then to make the new machine a global catalog server, go to Administrative Tools, Active Directory Sites and Services, Expand ,Sites, Default first site and Servers. Right click on the new server and select properties and tick the Global Catalog checkbox. (Global catalog is essential for logon as it needs to be queried to establish Universal Group Membership)

Assuming that you were using Active Directory Integrated DNS on the first Domain Controller, DNS make sure DNS is replicated to the new domain controller along with Active Directory. (You may need to install DNS seperately)

If you are using DHCP you should move this across the new 2003 domain controller, In a simple single domain this is easiest done by Setting up DHCP on the second Domain controller and using a scope on the same network that does not overlap with the existing scope on the other Domain Controller. Dont forget to set the default gateway (router) and DNS Servers.

Next you need to move the FSMO roles to the new 2003 machine - see http://www.petri.co.il/transferring_fsmo_roles.htm

You can of course copy data to the new server - you can use xcopy to copy data and keep the NTFS permissions.

You will need to configure clients with the DNS address of the new machine as the preferred DNS server.

You should then be able to demote and zap the old DC (test first). You can then install Windows 2003 server on the old machine, join it to the domain and promote it to be another DC.

If you want a resilliant solution then  Once Active Directory is installed then to make the new machine a global catalog server, go to Administrative Tools, Active Directory Sites and Services, Expand ,Sites, Default first site and Servers. Right click on the new server and select properties and tick the Global Catalog checkbox. (Global catalog is essential for logon as it needs to be queried to establish Universal Group Membership)

Check and if necessary install DNS on the machine as before

If you are using DHCP you should spread this across the domain controllers, In a simple single domain this is easiest done by Setting up DHCP on the second Domain controller and using a scope on the same network that does not overlap with the existing scope on the other Domain Controller. Dont forget to set the default gateway (router) and DNS Servers. Talking of which all the clients (and the domain controllers themselves) need to have their Preferred DNS server set to one domain controller, and the Alternate DNS to the other, that way if one of the DNS Servers fails, the clients will automatically use the other.
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jydrachAuthor Commented:
Another question before i proceed with this, is there a way of renaming a domain? For some reason the IT guys before me thought it was a good choice to name their domain with a XXXXXX.com instead of XXXXXX.local.  Is there any way of renaming this? or simply forget and run both domains simultaneoutly until i move everyone to the new one? Suggestions please.   thanks for the other replies! valid ideas.. keep them flowing.  :D
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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
It's possible once you upgrade to 2003
http://www.petri.co.il/windows_2003_domain_rename.htm
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sunshineknoxCommented:
This should also work with Windows 2000 Active Directory, right?
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Jeremy WeisingerSenior Network Consultant / EngineerCommented:
Nope. You can't change the name until you upgrade and raise the domain functional level to 2003.
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