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Windows Server 2003, DHCP update DNS, PTR ok but A not set

I am trying to set up a small home network using Windows Server 2003 R2 x64 for DNS and DHCP.
I want the DHCP server to always update the A and PTR records for any client that is issued a DHCP address.
I want to support XP, vista, Linux and Mac machines, thus I do not want to disable NetBIOS and have the DNS server be able to resolve all host names.

W2K3 R2 Server configured standalone, called server.home, workgroup home.
Server is static 10.0.0.20, gateway 10.0.0.1, DNS pointing to itself 10.0.0.20
Router address is 10.0.0.1

Q: Is it advisable to point the server static IP DNS configuration to itself?

I configured the DNS and DHCP options as follows:
DHCP scope is 10.0.0.33 to 10.0.0.128
DHCP set to enable dynamic updates, always update, discard when lease expires, and dynamically update hosts that do not support dynamic updates.
DNS forward scope is home, reverse for 10.0.0
DNS server set to allow both secure and insecure updates.

When a XP client, called xp.home, gets an IP from DHCP, the reverse zone gets a PTR registration, but there is no A record for xp.home

I tested similar configurations using W2K3 R2 x64 and Server 2008 RC0 x64.

Q: Any ideas why the PTR would update but not the A, and how do I solve this?

Regards
P.
0
ptr727
Asked:
ptr727
1 Solution
 
crawforditsCommented:
Consider setting up a domain account to use for updating records in DHCP.  Sounds like a permission issue.  Right Click DHCP server......
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ptr727Author Commented:
I am running in standalone server mode, no domains.
I have the DNS server set to not require authorization.

And if it was a permission issue, why would the PTR update but not the A, unless the client does that and not the DHCP server?
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ptr727Author Commented:
KCTS: I did configure DHCP to update DNS.
Quote from original text: "DHCP set to enable dynamic updates, always update, discard when lease expires, and dynamically update hosts that do not support dynamic updates."
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

Just curious, for the PTR Record it creates, what's the full name it points to? xp.home?

If so, there's actually a known issue with that. As your domain name (home) appears to be a top level domain in DNS clients won't update it (they've been told not to).

You can alter this behaviour by adding the registry entries detailed in this article:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/300684

HTH

Chris
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ptr727Author Commented:
Chris, the PTR registration is xp.home, and I can reverse lookup the IP.
The KB sounds interesting, I'll change the configuration to a multi level domain and report back.

On DNS sub domain configuration, if I have a domain say foo.com that is hosted by a provider, can I just configure my home DNS to be home.foo.com without needing to configure anything with the foo.com provider?

Regards
P.
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

That's correct, yes.

foo.com doesn't need to know about home.foo.com unless you expect to resolve names within home.foo.com over the Internet.

Chris
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ptr727Author Commented:
Chris, thanks, multi level domain solved the problem.
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:

Great stuff, glad I could help out.

Chris
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