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hard disk size

dear all!
i have 1 IBM Eseries Xseries 220 server. When i plug in 1 HDD with 250GB,and start in windows,my hard disk was unallocated in windows with 128GB and i've format it with 128GB and  how can i fix this?do i need to boot in DOS and partition my hard disk again,so in windows my hard disk will have 1 partition with 128GB and other is the rest.
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Johnriptest
Asked:
Johnriptest
1 Solution
 
jvuzCommented:
Which OS are you using?
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nobusCommented:
you probably run into the 127/128 gb limit.
here more info :  http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/hard_drives/hard_drive_size_barriers.htm
you need to check first if the drive is recognised as 250 in the bios. If not, you can look for a bios upgrade that adresses the 48-bit LBA limit in the bios.
if you run XP, you need SP2 - install it
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garycaseCommented:
The issue you're having is that your system only supports 28-bit logical block addressing, which limits drive sizes to 128GB.   You need to update to 48-bit LBA support and then you'll "see" the full disk.

How you do this depends on the OS you're using ... so when you answer the previous question we can help you.   With Windows XP it's simple --> you just have to update to SP2 (actually SP1 will do it).   With Windows 2000, you need to both update with the Service Packs and also add a key to the registry.

You also should check your BIOS to see if it has 48-bit support ==> just look in the BIOS and see what size it shows for the disk and you can tell.   While it's not necessary for it to support 48-bit LBA, if it does not you won't be able to run disk utilities that access the drive through the BIOS.
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garycaseCommented:
nobus => FYI as long as Win2K or XP is upgraded to 48-bit LBA, they will work fine with large disks even if the BIOS doesn't support the 48-bit addressing :-)   Their protected mode drivers don't utilize the BIOS for disk access.   But as I just noted above, lack of 48-bit support in the BIOS does have the potential for causing other issues.
[... it's also a 137/128GB limit ... not 127/128 :-) ]

... the safest thing to do on older systems that have 48-bit LBA issues is to only use 120GB drives :-)
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JohnriptestAuthor Commented:
uhm,my server bios version is 1.03.i've downloaded a bios flash update from IBM,but when i double click to run,nothing happen.and in my bios setup no hard disk recognise but in windows i can see my hard disk with 128GB size, by the way,my server using windows 2000 advanced.
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garycaseCommented:
Don't worry about the BIOS.

Here's what you need to do with Windows 2000:

=>  Update to the latest Service Pack (SP4)

=>  Add the EnableBigLBA value with a data value of 1 to the registry as noted in this Microsoft article:  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/305098

After you've done that and rebooted, Windows will recognize the full size of the disk.   IF the BIOS also supports 48-bit LBA, it's fairly simple to resize the partitions using 3rd party tools.   IF NOT, however, it's best to only use Window's Disk Management ... so I'd just create another partition for the rest of the disk.
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garycaseCommented:
... Note:  The Microsoft KB article indicates you must have a 48-bit LBA compatible BIOS.   I know for a fact this is NOT necessary with XP ... and I suspect it's also not required with 2000 ==> but if you make the changes detailed above and still don't see the full size of the disk in Disk Management, then that's most likely the issue.
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JohnriptestAuthor Commented:
and my server has 2 SCSI 17GB.and use it for operating system.
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pstrawserCommented:
make sure you did not have the pin on the HD as capped..    just use it as master or slave..
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jakosysadminCommented:
Do try to boot from the latest IBM UpdateXpress (IIRC, the version was 4.06 ==> http://www.google.com/search?q=updatexpress+4.06+download). It'll probably find that you need a near infinite multitudes of firmware updates to be applied. The firmware updates are on the same disk and it will happily do the job for you.
Definitely deal with the firmware BEFORE software (and don't forget to make backups before any of this) for it may (or may not) break the compatibility and the sudden change in the disk size it sees may (probably) present you with a completely empty disk ;)
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