How can a 'cached remote desktop session' be used, instead of users connecting to a spare PC?

A small office is using Small Business Server 2003 and most of the employees remotely connect to their own PC. They do this by using Small Business Server's remote web workspace feature, which then offers a list of available PC's to control using remote desktops.

However there are now more employees than PC's and ideally it would be useful to have a cached remote desktop session on the server, to avoid purchasing more PC's, which in reality will not be used at all in the office.

Is it possible / viable to use the server itself for remote desktop sessions and if so how can this be best achieved? Presumably Outlook could not be used in this situation for email and users would then need to use \\servername\exchange through Internet Explorer to access email?

Please advise as to the best way forward.
 
LVL 1
itcroydonAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Brian PiercePhotographerCommented:
It sounds to me like you need to think about which way you want to go on this. As I see it you have two possible routes.

1. Install a Terminal Server and run remote terminal sessions see http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/technologies/terminalservices/default.mspx

2. Use Sharepoint http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepointserver/FX100492001033.aspx

Which one to go for really depemds on your circumstances and what facilities you require
0
 
itcroydonAuthor Commented:
Are either option available by default in small business server? Also it is possible to establish a VPN connection and then use remote desktops directly on the server; however is this effectively a cached remote desktop session or is this just used really for server administration?
0
 
dreamyguyCommented:
Are either option available by default in small business server?

Yes

 Also it is possible to establish a VPN connection and then use remote desktops directly on the server?

Yes

however is this effectively a cached remote desktop session or is this just used really for server administration?

Terminal Servers has two modes of installation, one is called user mode, and the other is called administration mode, hence u can do both :)
0
Ultimate Tool Kit for Technology Solution Provider

Broken down into practical pointers and step-by-step instructions, the IT Service Excellence Tool Kit delivers expert advice for technology solution providers. Get your free copy now.

 
itcroydonAuthor Commented:
Which option uses the least bandwidth and if a remote VPN is established to the network, folllowed by a remote desktop connection to the server, how does the server differentiate between an admin based session and a user mode based session?

KCTS: The main considerations are performance and not purchasing extra PC's unless neccessary. Users need access to shared files, email and one or two specialist applications which have the data stored on the server.
0
 
itcroydonAuthor Commented:
It looks as if using terminal services in application mode has been disabled in SBS 2003 and therefore the only way to do this is via a separate server, or by using virtual server 2005.

( http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/sbs/evaluation/faq/term.mspx )
0
 
scadieuxCommented:
If you need to have more than one remote desktop session opened on one workstation you can install this patch which will allow you to do so.
http://www.kood.org/terminal-server-patch/
0
 
Brian PiercePhotographerCommented:
Microsoft have indeed prevented the implementauion of Terminal Server in application mode on SBS server. This is because it is a security threat to effectivly have users logging on to the Domain Controller. MS have always advised against installing TS on a DC but in SBS it is actually prevented.

The only LEGITIMATE way of using Terminal Services in Application mode of a SBS system is to install another server.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.