Unbound Continuous Form

Is it possible to have an unbound continuous form?  I am trying to create an unbound application, but I am stumped on how I should deal with a form that should be unbound.  It is a list of work orders form.
Aaron GreeneProgrammerAsked:
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Leigh PurvisConnect With a Mentor Database DeveloperCommented:
"Unbound" continuous forms methodologies (though obviously not actually *unbound*)...
http://www.utteraccess.com/forums/showflat.php?Cat=&Number=1512848

I'd post the summaries of it here - but that thread is just too lengthy.
Have a read - look at the latter example (also available in the examples page in my profile).
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ldunscombeCommented:
I'm not sure what you mean

Where is the list of work orders coming from ?
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peter57rCommented:
'Is it possible to have an unbound continuous form?'
No. It's impossible.

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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database ArchitectCommented:
'Unbound Form' and 'continuous form' are basically and oxymoron ... doesn't really make sense.  If controls are not bound, then every row will show the same value for each respective control - assuming the control is somehow populated.

mx
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ldunscombeCommented:
I have a feeling you mean an "Un-Linked" continuous "subform" in which case the answer would be yes. However the form must still get it's data from somewhere, either a table or a query etc.
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database ArchitectCommented:
Time for author input here ...

mx
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Aaron GreeneProgrammerAuthor Commented:
What I'm trying to do is to create a continuous form based on a recordset instead of a table.  I think the proper term would be a "disconnected ".  My first thought was to create the recordset and then fill a list box with the data from the recordset.  The problem that I ran into was that my recordset had more fields in it than I had space for in my control.  Now, I'm thinking that I need to create a temporary table from the recordset and then base the form on that.  I'll have to control changes to the data another way.
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database ArchitectCommented:
Purvis is your guy for disconnected recordsets ... in fact, he just published an Advisor article (two actually) on the subject :-)

mx
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Leigh PurvisDatabase DeveloperCommented:
And am well behind on planned subsequent pieces... man, but for more time!

What version of Access are you using (and deploying to)?
As this all gets much better *after* Access 2000 (FWIW it only first becomes at all possible in 2000 - but the options grow with 2002 onwards).
For example - you can then bind your listbox to your recordset, and then the form to that same recordset (a more efficient methodology than even Access employs internally - hitting the db only once for the data of listbox and form).

A (hopefully) nice simple example of a disconnected recordset / continuous form operation is in the example I pointed you to previously.  (The "Orders Recordset" option - which opens frmOrderUnboundRecordset).

(There's also the local table variation too - which uses larger scale bulk SQL executions to move the data, which I'd really recommend in Acc 2000 too).
Both examples show retrieving and updating data.
(There are nuances that exist on the techniques offered - variations a plenty).
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