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How to make brushes colorful?

Hi,

I found some nice brushes on dA e.g.in http://shadow-brushes.deviantart.com/art/flame-brushes-23296825 and http://shadow-brushes.deviantart.com/art/smoke-brushes-set-I-23723572

Well, I can use these brushes in ps, but they do look un-colored, they do only have the foreground color. I guess there's some kind of "trick" or correct usage of brushes. Can someone give me a quick tutorial/tipp how to work with brushes like these, how to colorize them?

Thanks in advance,
su-n
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su-n
Asked:
su-n
4 Solutions
 
SheharyaarSaahilCommented:
use them on a different layer than your image, and then use Belnding Options to color them.
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v2MediaCommented:
Agreed. Layers, layers and more layers...
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wildbrookmediaCommented:
If you put a brush on its own layer, ctrl+click on it in the layers palette.  This should make it a selection.  Create a new layer above it fill that layer with a gradient or something.  that should work.
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192_168_1_103Commented:
You're probably using the brush correctly.  Brushes in Photoshop are basically greyscale images that tell Photoshop how much opacity each pixel of the brush area should have.  So, you really only get one color.

You *can* vary the color of the brush as you draw.  Open up your brushes pallette (I think in Photoshop CS it was over on the upper right, in CS3, it's selectable on the new dock).  You'll see an option for "Color dynamics, where you can determine a whole bunch of stuff...  Like, how much to vary between foreground and background colors, how much to vary the Hue, Saturation, Lightness, and so on.  You can even set many of these values to be controlled my a Pen tablet, if you have one.

Take a look over the other options while you're in there; they won't have much to do with color, but if you've never been in that pallette, you'll be atonished by how much the brushes can actually do.  I use spacing, scattering, and angle jitter for all kind of things all the time.  And if you click on some of the default brushes like the grass or leaves brushes, you can check out how the settings have been arranged to achieve those particular effects.

All of that stuff affects the brush *as you paint*.
If you're looking to just colorize a stamped greyscale (or other single-coloe) image from a brush set, you might try something like Image>Adjustments>Gradient Map, which maps various tonal levels to the colors in your selected gradient.  Or, as others have suggested, you may need to paint over the stamped image with a normal brush on a separate layer, one color at a time (if you need very specific coloring).
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ramimassoudCommented:
Look it's not the brush that is colorful, the brush come in black and white with a certain opacity. It is actually the image that is colorful, try using a compination of different brushes with different colors to create your image, use layers everytime you draw something with the brush, that way it will be easy for you to delete sth tht you dont want, and it ill help you to displace the object that you draw in case you want to move it and put it in a different location in the overlay. use gradiant map layers to create nice images... that will also affect your brushes colors after being drawn to give the feel that the brush contained different colors.
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