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Combine an internal Exchange server with an External Linux server, need help!

Hello,
I have a Linux server that receives email and send emails on domain mycompany.com. This is a new Linux server that has POP3, IMAP and SMTP opened and has a public IP. I have a new Exchange server that is behind a Firewall that blocks all incoming traffic. The idea is to configure this Exchange and something like POPBeamer, which is a higher-end POP3 connector to retrieve emails from that Linux server. So far so good.

Here is my question, I would like to bring this server online gradually. The problem is that when I add a user to the Exchange and that user is sending to another internal email (the exchange is configured to handle mycompany.com). if that other accounts isnt created on the Exchange. It wont send it to the Linux, but keep it locally. If this account is created on the Exchange it will send it, but the users who are not configured to work on the Exchange yet will not receive it, since its staying locally on the Exchange. Any ideas on how to solve this issue?

Should I just bring the SMTP connector and have all emails send using the external IP address of the Linux server? Will that bypass the Exchange?

Any ideas will be greatly appreciated.

SP.
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SpiderPig
Asked:
SpiderPig
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1 Solution
 
redseatechnologiesCommented:
There is a way to get Exchange to forward all mail that it doesnt know about to another server - what you are doing is sharing an address space

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/321721

I would also like to point out that what you are doing is really not a good idea - programs like popbeamer, infact all pop3 connectors, are rubbish, and will cause all manner of problems.  Why you want a linux server infront of exchange is beyond me - I mean, why not just get the thing to relay mail back to the server?
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SpiderPigAuthor Commented:
The idea was to have redundancy. If the Exchange is down the Linux will still receive emails, and not forward them to a black hole. We have remote users as well that doesnt need an exchange server, so its a good solution to have them access the Linux directly. I was thinking about this long time, but I just couldnt find another way to achieve this. Keep in mind that was pre Exchange 2007. The system is Exchange 2003. I dont trust 2007 yet.

Thanks,
SP.
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redseatechnologiesCommented:
If your intention is to forever use the POP3 connector, I would rethink the solution.

What happens if linux is down?  Then you have NO mail, so you have no redundancy.
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SpiderPigAuthor Commented:
There will be 2 Linux servers there complimenting each other. I think this is a solution for a year or two until 2007 becomes more stable, and then I will put an array of 2007s in HQ and Datacenter. I understand in 2007 they finally addressed these issues.

Let me go over the link and see if it can make me do what I want to do.

Thanks for your help.
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SpiderPigAuthor Commented:
Just thought about something, we are using Blackberrys for all staff, these BB are configured to talk to the Linux server right now using Verizon's BB Ent servers (we dont have a BB Ent Server). If we bring the Exchange up and move everyone to the Exchange, internal emails will not be pushed to the BB's since they never reached the Linux server. This thing getting really complicated.

What do you guys think about Exchange 2007? Should I use it? My philosophy so far was to wait for SP1 before installing any MS product for productions, but I heard the 2007 introduces some net server functionality. Let me ask you that, how would you configure a 50 user fast growing Exchange environment? This will easly grow to 100-150 with a 1-1.5 years period.

So as you can see the plot evolves and keeps getting complicated. Implementation of this project was postponed for the week of Thanks Giving.

thanks again for all your help.
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redseatechnologiesCommented:
There are two ways to look at it.

You could either buy your Ex2007 license now, and install 2003 (the license will let you do that).  Then you can wait til SP1 and migrate to new hardware then.

Or, you could go straight to 2007 now.  Personally, I am not using 2007, nor have I used it much (I have been telling myself that I should for about 8 months now!) - but I have been on and dealt with many reliable deployments.

What is your timescale?

Exchange 2007 SP1 is not far away at all (I would get more specific, but I would probably breach an NDA)
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SpiderPigAuthor Commented:
Sounds good! Are you working at MS or something? :)

Lets just say its going to be a long night. I am going to work on several plans to approach this project.

I will keep you updates.

Thanks again for the prompt response.

SP.
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redseatechnologiesCommented:
>>Are you working at MS or something?

No, but I am an MVP - meaning I have access to a heap of cool stuff from them.  The key problem is that I no longer know what I can say, and what I can't - some things (thinking hard for a no-longer NDA'd issue! - here is hoping) like the Vista SP1 update - we knew about that quite early, as well as what was in it, and early access to the betas, etc.

Let me know how you get on - I think no matter what you do, it needs to be a totally seemless solution.  Obviously, being an MS kinda guy, I think it should be a total Exchange solution - but if you don't want to do that, don't split it - use an all linux solution if you must.

Good luck

-red
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SpiderPigAuthor Commented:
Cheers mate!

SP.
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