NTFS directory questions.

Posted on 2007-10-11
Last Modified: 2010-04-20
I am running windows 2003 server standard R2.

The server is a domain controller.

I want to setup directorys on the second drive.

In those directorys I want certain people to access directorys, some should be able to ready some shouldn't, some should be able to modify/change, add files.

Can someone advise step by step.

Question by:nrizk07
    LVL 70

    Accepted Solution

    You need to set both SHARE and NTFS permissions.

    When you share a folder it has share permissions. For the most part, if your drives are formatted as NTFS then give the 'Everyone' Group 'Full Control' at the share level (you will need to change the default permission on the Sharing Tab as the Default is 'Everyone' Read). This may seem odd and insecure but it is not as NFTS itself allows you much greater control of permissions. It is usual to allow full control at the share level and then tie down permissions with NTFS.

    If you right click on a folder and go to the Security Tab, it will show you the NTFS Permissions. Normally you will want a shared folder not to inherit permissions from its parent folder or drive, So go to the Advanced Tab and clear the 'Inherit from parent...' box and COPY the permissions when prompted.

    You can then edit/add/remove groups from the security tab and assign each the required permissions. So if you want the Marketing Group to have full access to a folder, add the Marketing Group and Assign them Full Control. If you want the Sales Group to be able to read the folder and files but not add/delete/change anything, add the Sales group and leave the default permissions, (read, read and execute list folder contents). To stop others accessing the folder remove the Everyone and (domain) Users Groups from the list.

    It is enough that groups do not appear on the list to stop them getting access. You do not normally need to DENY. If a user is a member of two or more groups they get the best of their cumulative NTFS Permissions (unless a deny is present, in which case it overrides).

    Normally the standard permissions will be sufficient for most purposes; if you want to be more prescriptive you can use the 'Advanced' option and set advanced permissions.

    If users have both share and NTFS permissions they get the most restrictive of the combination of the combined NTFS/Share permissions (which is why it is normal to allow Full Control on the share and rely on NTFS permissions)

    It is usual to give permissions to groups, not to users as this makes for easier management. If a new person joins the sales team, you just add them to the sales group and they automatically get all the permissions assigned to the Sales Group. If someone moves from Marketing to sales you remove them from the Marketing group and they lose all the Marketing Group Permissions, when you then add them to sales they get all the permissions of the sales group. As already stated a user can be a member of multiple groups.

    See for more info

    Once a folder is shared with the correct folder and NTFS permissions users can connect to it using the UNC path name, it they can type \\ServerName\ShareName at the run Prompt. Alternatively they can map a drive to the folder. To do this click on Tools, Map Network drive in Windows Explorer and  assign any unused drive letter to the shared folder. The folder will then appear a s Network drive in My Computer
    LVL 10

    Expert Comment

    What he said :)

    Author Comment

    Awesome!!!! You are the best!! :)

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