How can I bypass the certificate warning once I'm logging to my Web Outlook Account?

I do have Web Outlook active on my exchange server so I did install a local certificate in order to make it working, now the only problem is that every time I try to open the site I get a warning message about the certificate not being trusted. Is there a way to tell IE not to bug me anymore with that?

Thanks
jdff
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jdffAsked:
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SembeeCommented:
The best way to get rid of the certificate prompt is to buy a certificate. You don't have pay for verisign's overpriced, under spec certificates. You can get certificates for US$20 - $60 depending on where you look.

Simon.

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tigermattCommented:
Yes, you certainly can. I guess you've created the SSL certificate yourself, which would mean IE doesn't trust it because it isn't issued by a known certificate issuer (Verisign, Godaddy etc.). To overcome this, you simply need to install your certificate into your workstation's (the one you're accessing OWA through) trusted certificate store. In IE6, when you are prompted with the warning box, just click "View Certificate", then the "Install Certificate" button. With IE7, you get a "Certificate Error" box appear next to the address bar. You need to click that and view the certificate, then click the "Install Certificate" button and follow the import wizard.

-tigermatt
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jdffAuthor Commented:
I did what you said, using IE 7 it did import successfully, but every time I go to the website it prompts to accept the certificate again.

jdff
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tigermattCommented:
Hmmm... I've just tried it here on IE7 (I have a self-signed SSL certificate). My certificate is issued for internal purposes to the local DNS domain name, so <servername>.<mydomain>.local. When I imported the certificate and accessed the encrypted site with the FQDN <servername>.<mydomain>.local, I wasn't prompted and everything worked fine.

However, also registered on my internal DNS is the external domain. I tried using this, and I was still prompted for the certificate.

This would make it look like the certificate warning will still appear if the server you are accessing (i.e. www.<yourdomain>.com is what is mentioned on the certificate. You may want to check this as I would probably guess that it is issued to the internal domain of your server (i.e. with a .local extension)

-tigermatt
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tigermattCommented:
I don't really know why I didn't mention this above! Try GoDaddy, Their prices are very reasonable https://www.godaddy.com/gdshop/ssl/ssl.asp?ci=8979
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Muzafar MominCommented:
you can use Global certificate , whic can be get from Versign etc...
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tigermattCommented:
Verisign is the first company everybody thinks of when looking for SSL certificates, yet they charge rediculous prices. Unless you're a large corporation, you would want to be looking at one of the smaller SSL issuers, such as GoDaddy, who are much cheaper and Godaddy root CA is still trusted automatically by over 90% of browsers.
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