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Networking program between two different physical sites.

Hi. I am trying to help a friend who has opened a new physician's office. They are across town from me, not that that matters. For two years, they have used an electronic medical record system on a domain using eight Windows XP Pro workstations and Windows Server 2003 all hard wired. They use a Cisco router with a cable connection for Internet. Never a problem.

At the new site approximately thirty miles from their first site, they are setting up a similar network with ten computers XP Pro and SBS 2003 Standard R2. Using Cisco PIX 501 and switch and same cable company. Both have static IPs.

Is there a simple way to connect both offices so that all of the computers running the Electronic Medical Record can "see" each other and run off one database? If so, how? And, would it be secure? Would this be a place for VPN? They are planning on hiring an IT to start, but they are just seeing if it is feasible. For the most part, money isn't a big issue, but they do have a budget. Thanks.
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Bert2005
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Bert2005
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Neadom TuckerCommented:
You would use a VPN to create a secure tunnel to both offices.  However, most of your electronic medical software is run using windows so a VPN would not be the best solution.  Too much data.

You should host the application at one of the offices and get a T1 for data at that site.  Then use either terminal services or Cytrix to connect to the server.  Must less network load and much faster!
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Bert2005Author Commented:
Thanks. By hosting, do you mean that one office would host the database on their server? And then would the T1 only be used for connecting to the other office or would it also be used to connect to the Internet and not use Roadrunner? Also, is Cytrix the same as Citrix? I'm guessing yes?
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Neadom TuckerCommented:
Yes that is correct! It would be both.  The ideal situation would be to get a T1 from a Telcom Company like ITC Deltacom, Covad, Nuvox, Spirit Telcom, AT&T.  Have them setup a VPN for your Dr. friend that way you don't have to worry about it.  The satellite office would get it's internet connection from the main office.

You friend needs to check with the software company to see if it supports Terminal Services.

Yes it was a typo I meant Citrix!
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Bert2005Author Commented:
Thanks suthngin,

Gotta love the nick. I have to head home and get at least a Heineken. What a week.

From my office, I have a VPN using Easy VPN through my PIX to the hospital. I have to login using Citrix. So, I guess it's the same thing.

So, all applications do not support Terminal Services?
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Neadom TuckerCommented:
Well that is a loaded question.  Can you open the application using Terminal Services?  Yes but can you open multiple instances of the application that is the question.

Many apps are not supported by Terminal Services.  Many are.  It's just better to check.  I have quite a few Dr. Offices setup using Terminal Services for their outside offices.

Thanks again!
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Bert2005Author Commented:
I only wish there were good IT people in the Bangor, Maine area.  
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