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Installing SATA RAID card in Vmware Server

I have a Windows 2003 SP2 Standard where a SATA RAID card is installed and working. On this machine I installed VMware server. On VMware server I installed Windows 2003 Standard. The SATA RAID card is not seen on the Windows 2003 virtual system. I tried installing the drivers of the card for W2K3 on the host, but it shows the device with a exclamation in device manager. What should I do to have this card installed properly?
Thank you.
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cembi
Asked:
cembi
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4 Solutions
 
nathana21Commented:
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cembiIT Author Commented:
This a RocketRAID 222x from Highpoint Technologies. Your link is telling me that this will not work. Hard to believe there's no solution. Thank you.
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nathana21Commented:
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Bart van der WeeCommented:
You will need to configure the SATA Raid on your Host System and create the virtual disks for your virtual machines on it.

VMWare server/workstation does not pass-through PCI cards - only usb, video, sound and network adapters.
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cembiIT Author Commented:
vanderwee, can you detail a bit more??  How do I configure SATA Raid  and create the virtual disks for the virtual machines?! Thanks.
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Bart van der WeeCommented:
It might pay to let us know what you are trying to achieve?

Reboot the server- physical VMWare server. During the DOS boot process there should show the initialization of the RAID adapter and to press CTRL+H to configure
From there you can configure the type of RAID array you want RAID 0,1,5 or 10

Otherwise from within the Windows VMWare server you should be able to install the drivers and web-based raid configuration utility. Configure the RAID array as required.

Once you have configured the RAID array you can then creat a disk under: computer management -> disk management

Let us know how you go.
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cembiIT Author Commented:
vanderwee. Thanks for the comment. The SATA RAID card is installed on a Dell server and a SATA unit (external) is connected to this card. On this SATA unit there are 4 SATA drives configured on a RAID 5. This is working in the current OS (W2k3 Enterprise) and it shows as F: drive letter. What I need is to be able to have this same configuration under the virtual W2k3 system which means be able to see this same drive as the F: drive. Basically for this I only need to have this virtual OS detect the SATA card (correct?) and then the manufacturer's software takes care of managing it.
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Bart van der WeeCommented:
OK - when you create you virtual machine - when you add a disk drive, select use a physical disk and select the F: drive/RAID 5 disk array.

Please readup what VMWare say about this as they only provide limited support for this feature.

Bart
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arrkerr1024Commented:
I think the thing you need to understand is that, in vmware, everything is virtual.  vmware doesn't (with few exceptions) have direct access to the cards in your physical server.  Even the hard drives are not really hard drives, they're files on the host server's disks.  In vmware the pci cards are all going to say "vmware virtual network adapter" "vmware virtual video card", etc... (not exact wording, but you get the point) - they're all virtual, you don't load drivers for your physical video card, hard drive card, etc... in to vmware, you load vmware's virtual drivers - all the hardware specific stuff ONLY gets done at the host level.

If you need to have an F drive on your virtual machine what you do is configure a second drive in vmware server, but that drive is not going to be physical, it is going to be a file on the host, and that file can be located anywhere you want.  That said, you can (as others have said earlier), enable direct access to a drive from the guest, but then the host can no access the drive.  And even in this situation, the guest still sees the "vmware virtual hard drive controller", all of the actual configuration (drivers, raid setup, etc) happen on the host.

Hope that helps to clarify.  Its just a matter of wrapping your brain around everything being virtual!
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arrkerr1024Commented:
Just to add one more comment - the huge benefit for everything being virtual is that you can have a billion host servers, all with different physical hardware, and you can move that guest from one host to another (even from windows to linux) with out any changes because to the guest everything stays the same (still have the same virtual video card, virtual hard drive controller, etc...).
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S00007359Commented:
Hi,

You can't leverage the SATA RAID controller in your virtual machine. Even if you did, you won't be able to maximise or use it in the sense you wish to. VMware Server can allow you to use a virtual disk and you ca specify either a BusLogic or LSI Visrtual Hard Disk. You will be required to download the appropriate driver for that, but i am sorry to say that you can't access the host machines SATA RAID Controller directly from the Virtual machine.

If you are trying to leverage to the SATA RAID Redundacy, you can ddirectly use the hard disks on the controller, rather than creating a virtual hard disk. It's a fairly easy way to do it, but reommede d for high/tech users.

Thanks
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