Hub Sold as "Switch"

A coworker of mine told me that you have to be careful when you purchase a switch these days because manufactures will label a simple Layer 1 hub as a "switch" in an effort to improve sales.  I'm skeptical.  Is he correct?
jdanaAsked:
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TreyHCommented:
Was really just joking about the 'old' days about the fine print. Even then, most of the time price would tell you if it was a true switch or not. Nowadays, If you stay with the name brands: Cisco, Linksys, DLink, Netgear ect.. I don't think you'll be able to find a 'hub' anymore anyway. Like donjohnston said, it's the low-end 'never heard of' brands you have to shy away from. One dead giveaway however would be if the unit only had one 'collision' indicator light on it. Ironically, I find it harder to find a true 'hub'. We use small hubs for troubleshooting in the field. Packetsniffing is easiest with a hub and my old stockpile is dwindling...... :)
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btassureCommented:
I have NEVER seen this happen. Not to mention that to do so would almost certainly contravene your local advertising laws by selling a product that does not operate as described. If this actually does happen you could probably make enough from suing them to buy yourself a very nice layer 3 switch :o)
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
>If this actually does happen you could probably make enough from suing them to buy yourself a very nice layer 3 switch

Good luck with that.

I have run across hubs sold as switches and switches sold as hubs. It's one of the reasons to beware of the really low-end products.
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TreyHCommented:
Most of the small office switches sold today are actual 'switches'. The Hub/Switch wordplay was when 100mb first came out. You would see advertisments for a 10/100 switch, when actually the only switching that was performed was between the 10mb and 100mb backplane on the device. I still find myself reading the fine print on todays stuff however ...
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jdanaAuthor Commented:
TreyH,
When you're reading the fine print, do you look for "layer 2 switch"?  Or, do you simply try to avoid a "10/100 switch"?  Or, is there another telling phrase that you might look for?
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