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how safe are VPN users

I'm in the middle of setting up a webspace service (using VPN and sharepoints through samba) to allow people to connect through a vpn and get access to their own network drives.

While different people are connected to the VPN, they are obviously in the same address pool (or LAN) as other users from around the world. Can those internal users sniff / hack into each other's computers just as easy as if there was no VPN, or does the VPN offer better security in that scenario. The only obvious thing it will do, is block out anyone who is not logged into the VPN itself, but that doesn't necessarily mean that our users are going to be saints ...

Any suggestions or feedback on security for this topic would be greatly appreciated.

-Mel
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melligeorgiou
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melligeorgiou
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1 Solution
 
trinak96Commented:
The easiest way around this would be to NOT allow computers on the same subnet (your remote clients) to be able to communicate with eachother.
Or if their VPN software clients then do NOT put same subnet traffic into the protected routes.
Basically you create the "interesting traffic" to your main site only and deny same subnet communication. This way the traffic will not be pushed to the tunnel.


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melligeorgiouAuthor Commented:
Sounds good .. I'm using Mac OS X Server 10.4 for the VPN, and I'm not sure how to block same subnet communication. There doesn't seem to be anything in the GUI that lets me do this, so it's probably a terminal procedure..

Can anyone help me with this?

Thanks,

-Mel
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trinak96Commented:
I dont know about the Mac setup unfortunately.
Your better off raising a new question and adding it to the Mac Zone.
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melligeorgiouAuthor Commented:
Thanks!
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