Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1251
  • Last Modified:

Best solution for laptop to projector OVER 100feet

I am trying to connect a laptop to a projector, which are almost exactly 100 feet apart.  What is the best (and CHEAPEST) way to do this.

The laptop has DVI out (and I have a DVI to VGA converter, so either DVI or VGA would be fine).  The projector has DVI input, VGA input, RCA input, and I think S-Video input.

Would something like this: http://www.topmicrousa.com/ibm-vga-100-mm.html (100 foot VGA to VGA cable) actually have good signal quality?

Any comments about this are greatly appreciated!
-Kyle
0
kylen1010
Asked:
kylen1010
3 Solutions
 
☠ MASQ ☠Commented:
Have a look at this very similar question: http:Q_22894266.html

Yes a VGA cable will work over that distance but you would normally expect some drop in signal quality (far less than an unboosted DVI cable though).
0
 
Jaime OlivaresSoftware ArchitectCommented:
use a DVI fiber optic cable.
Since DVI signal is digital it is most suitable for extension without loss of sharpness.

Example:
http://www2.dvigear.com/fiopca.html?source=AdWords_DVIFiberOpticCable3&gclid=CIDb05y_oI8CFTyKOAodNhdmVg
0
 
kylen1010Author Commented:
MASQUERAID: Thank you for your comment.  Do you know how much signal loss i would experience?  I am going to be using this for powerpoints with mainly just words (not a whole lot of pictures).  Thanks.

jaime_olivares: Thank you for your comment as well, but I cannot spend $735 on this cable.  I'm looking for something around $50, and $100 max. Thank you
0
Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
☠ MASQ ☠Commented:
For text you should be fine, if you were presenting video you might notice some loss.
0
 
kode99Commented:
A VGA cable is about the only thing in your budget.  There are a number of VGA/DVI/video etc over Cat5 but this would probably be about double what you want to spend.

Even a high quality shielded vga cable is going to run up around $100 or so.  I would be a bit skeptical about the $30 cable linked being up for the job.

http://www.cablestogo.com/product.asp?cat%5Fid=2810&sku=28018

You can however get a VGA signal booster.  So if your signal is not good enough with just the cable add one of these boosters for ~$50 and you should be just fine.

http://www.cablestogo.com/product.asp?cat%5Fid=3417&sku=29559

A lot will depend on the resolution.  Basically  the higher resolution you use the shorter the distance that you can get before the signal gets bad.  The booster linked is rated for 1920x1440 at up to 200 feet.  The booster would probably help to compensate for a less than perfect cable.


0
 
pheidiusCommented:
I agree that the key to this is a booster on either type of cable you choose. I have run 50 feet of shielded vga with video/text/etc projection with a pretty cheap radio shack  booster scaled at 1920 by something. My two cents difference from the above posters would be looking at what kind of DVI your card puts out and what kind of DVI in your projector takes along with its max native resolution. If your card does not output dual link dvi and or your projector does not go over the 1920 mark with its DVI in then why pay for the more expensive dvi cable(Even if you just go with cheaper single link dvi, if that is all one or the other end can handle). VGA cable can almost exactly match single link DVI resolutions apple to apple with just a little scaling at the highest end. For text based presentations no one has sharp enough vision to distinguish between scaled 1920 and native 1920 rez. I just went though a similar decison process when I upgraded to a dual link capable Quadro FX4500  on my presentation workstation. My Dell 5100 MP will only do 1920 by 1400 odd using its proprietal DVI in or the vga in so I decided not to bother upgrading the cable and booster.
0
 
lsolheimCommented:
I have recently run a projector approximately 500' by using the following combination of cables and adapters... I am running the presentations in medium resolution 800x600 and the quality seems very adequate for our purposes.

From the computer... I run the presentation from the S-Video jack (because it was easier and cheaper to convert to coax).  I use a short S-Video cable to a S-Video to Female RCA converter (available at Radio Shack for about $21.95).  Then I use a Male RCA to Female F-Connector adapter ($2.95 at Radio Shack).  I then run a standard RG-6 video cable for the length of the run (for 100' you should be able to buy a good one for around $30 or so).  At the projector, I use a Female F-Connector to Male RCA adapter (another $2.95) and plug that into the composite video input on the projector.

The cool thing about doing it that way is that I can use a switcher at the computer end to have several different feeds that go to the projector (like a DVD player, one or more video cameras, and obviously the computer).  It works flawlessly with even my cable run of about 400' without a booster.  A booster may help, but I didn't find it necessary.

You may find that you need better resolution that you would get by using the S-Video output, but at that price I think it is worth a try.

Good luck.
0
 
kylen1010Author Commented:
Thank you very much everyone! I just purchased a 100' VGA for $50.  So it might not be the highest quality out there, but i think it will work for what i am trying to do. Thanks again. I'll keep you all posted on how it works! Thanks!
-Kyle
0

Featured Post

[Webinar] Database Backup and Recovery

Does your company store data on premises, off site, in the cloud, or a combination of these? If you answered “yes”, you need a data backup recovery plan that fits each and every platform. Watch now as as Percona teaches us how to build agile data backup recovery plan.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now