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Which licensing (CAL) model for SQL Server 2005 Standard to be accessed from within Terminal Services?

My remote network consists of 3 servers (Web, Terminal/Production, Database).  All internal users access these three servers using Device CALs from my Terminal Server Licensing pool.

I am about to purchase SQL Server 2005 Standard and install it on the Database server.  

The SQL server will be queried/touched by:
- apps on the Web server (not public so concurrency, while important, is not extremely high)
- users on the Terminal server (i.e. from within Microsoft Access via ODBC)
- developers/administrators on the Database server (directly logging in to the server)

From one perspective, I would say that I need 3 Device CALs only:  There are but 3 devices which will touch the SQL server within the network, since remote users connect via Terminal Services.  Is this scenario realistic?

From another perspective, I could imagine that Microsoft would ignore the local devices in use and look out toward the end-user devices, such as my home PC, even though my actions are routed through a local device.  Should I be considering User CALs for this reason?

From a third perspective, I realize that more than one simultaneous query will be passed to SQL Server from, say, multiple concurrent users on the web applications, or multiple users on the Terminal server querying the back-end database, etc.  If I am using Device CALs, and knowing the 3 servers within my network (despite the fact that there are multiple external users, both web-based and terminal-based), should I be OK?

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psk1
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psk1
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2 Solutions
 
imitchieCommented:
basically once it hits a web server, you need per processor licencing

http://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=213648
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psk1Author Commented:
OK, let me drop the WEB portion of my question, please.

I need to know if a Device CAL on SQL Server, when being allocated over Terminal Services, considers the console device (on the LAN) to be the licensee, or considers the remote terminal client device (across the WAN) to be the licensee.  Assume access directly to SQL Server and via ODBC on the LAN using, for example, Microsoft Access.
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BrughCommented:
With Terminal Sevrers, you are "supposed" to license each CLIENT that connects to the terminal server according to MS's statement about Multiplexing and pooling

I won't state my opinions on MS's extremely poor licensing concepts. :)

Multiplexing: Using Middleware, Transaction Servers, and Multitiered Architecture
Published: November 7, 2005

Sometimes organizations develop network scenarios that use various forms of hardware and/or software that reduce the number of devices or users that directly access or use the software on a particular server, often called "multiplexing" or "pooling" hardware or software. Use of such multiplexing or pooling hardware and/or software does not reduce the number of client access licenses (CALs) required to access or use SQL Server software. A CAL is required for each distinct device or user to the multiplexing or pooling software or hardware front end. This remains true no matter how many tiers of hardware or software exist between the server running SQL Server and the client devices that ultimately use its data, services, or functionality. An exception to this includes the manual transfer of data from employee to employee. For example, if an employee sends a Microsoft Excel version of a report to another employee, the receiving employee does not require a CAL. An additional exception is communication exclusively between the servers running SQL Server.

For more information about multiplexing and SQL Server licensing, see the SQL Server Pricing and Licensing page.


 - Brugh



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psk1Author Commented:
Well this is just insane
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imitchieCommented:
I can't understand why you are "dropping" the WEB portion since you made it obvious you have web usage. Whether you feel that there will not be many simultaneous connections or not is not the question, it is an example of pooling/multiplexing.  If you intend to bend rules, why not just get 1 licence... for what it's worth
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psk1Author Commented:
I can output the data from SQL Server and point the web server to that.  I don't need the web server to access SQL Server directly.

I do need to figure out the right way for internal users to be licensed.
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imitchieCommented:
brugh seems spot on, which is also mentioned in the first link.
terminal services = just another layer. the Device CAL is for end user to SQL Server

crude analogy - sql server accessible only via direct crossover LAN cable

user 1 plugs lan cable to SQL server, disconnects lan cable
user 2 plugs lan cable to SQL server, disconnects

you still need 2 x cal
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psk1Author Commented:
About User CALs:

I'm a user.  One guy.  But I use several different Windows usernames.  Am I one User CAL or several User CALs?
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psk1Author Commented:
I get the point about "a device is a device, no matter how many layers it goes through" (thought I'd like to argue that point).

I am hoping to hear that "a user is a user, no matter how many logons he has", because that would at least mean that Microsoft is consistent in this labyrinth of licensing models.
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imitchieCommented:
check Microsoft licencing, I'm pretty sure a multi-user XP machine is considered 1 device. we're talking about machines a.k.a. devices, not users.

work machine = 1. home machine = 1.

work machine login "admin" + work machine login "main" + work machine login "user" = 1, i.e. 1 "machine"

work machine via TS = 1. home machine via TS = 1. 2 end "devices"
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imitchieCommented:
if you would just read the link in the first post, where there is a detailed debate about it...

Nice try, but you're mixing up "users" and "logins". That's not how its licensed. The licensing still needs a CAL per "each distinct device or user to the multiplexing or pooling software or hardware frontend"

user 1 via work machine via ts - 1
user via work machine work directly - 1
user via home machine via ts - 1
etc
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psk1Author Commented:
I read the posts in the link.  Probably the most useful information I've found but I'm still fuzzy on what Microsoft considers a user.

Is a distinct PERSON a user, or is a unique LOGIN a user?  And, if the latter, is that Windows login or is that SQL login?

I get the Device thing perfectly, just not the User thing yet.
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imitchieCommented:
I think thinking it as distinct PERSON or distinct USER per se is probably not strictly correct.

If I, as a user, log onto two machines using the same account and run the same program, I would expect that to be 2 x CAL
So, even for 1 user, 1 account, I need 2 x CAL
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