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How can I connect a network printer/copier wirelessly?

Posted on 2007-11-13
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Last Modified: 2008-02-01
My friend has a copier business and he's installed print boards in his Sharp AR-337 copiers. This gives the copier a NIC (and IP address) and enables the copier to be hooked up to a router or switch and be installed on PCs as a networked printer.

He's asked me to help him with one of his clients who has the copier in a far room with no wired access. (They have two computers networked (wired) through an off-brand wireless router.)

Is there a way, using an access point, to network the copier/printer wirelessly?

The only way I've seen so far is to replace the router with a Netgear WGT624 Wireless Firewall Router and use a Linksys WAP54G Wireless Access Point in repeater mode, so that the printer/copier can connect with the access point via Ethernet cable. Linksys's documentation says that the access point point can only be in repeater mode with the WGT624 Router.

The client is reluctant to replace their perfectly good router, so is there another way to do this?

Thanks for the help, and sooner is better than later.
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Question by:reckon
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13 Comments
 
LVL 11

Assisted Solution

by:tvman_od
tvman_od earned 2000 total points
ID: 20277314
How about something like this?
http://www.pricegrabber.com/user_sales_getprod.php?masterid=578847&lot_id=7540274

It's sort of wireless bridge/hub, so you connect ethernet wire to it and it connects to existing wireless network (some configuration required). Consider wireless speed limitations.
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Ahmed Abdel Salam
ID: 20277872
you need to use a print server, connect usb or parallel prot from the printer to the print server and it will connect to ur wireless network
http://www.dlink.com/products/category.asp?cid=10&sec=0
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Author Comment

by:reckon
ID: 20288843
tv-man--that looks great. Sounds like it will connect to any router.

X-Reagent: no usb or parallel connection; just ethernet cable.
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:tvman_od
ID: 20290891
Another option is to use a laptop with wireless and ethernet adaptors located nearby the printer. You can connect your printer using cross-over cable to the laptop and bridge ethernet and wireless interfaces. Speed limitations are the same plus laptop has to be up and running when other people printing.
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Author Comment

by:reckon
ID: 20413426
I haven't abandoned the question--a posting I thought I made apparently didn't go through.

I've been waiting for responses to that last posting.

I will repost.
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:tvman_od
ID: 20414805
I still monitoring the question
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Author Comment

by:reckon
ID: 20437229
This question has not been abandoned. I don't know how much clearer I can be.
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Author Comment

by:reckon
ID: 20438433
My apologies. My friend's client had stalled everything because of their renovation, but now is leaning more toward the wireless solution and is willing to consider a new router and access point.

Let me ask this (or should I post a new question?):

Does anyone have experience with actually doing what I'm talking about with a router and access point? That is, use a  Linksys WGT624 router and  Linksys WAP54G Wireless Access Point in repeater mode, so that the printer/copier can connect to the network via ethernet cable attached to the wireless access point.

Thanks for your patience, and I hope to close this question soon.
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LVL 11

Assisted Solution

by:tvman_od
tvman_od earned 2000 total points
ID: 20439280
Should work but still, I'd recommend to use a device which will act like a client. Personally I didn't use Linksys in repeater mode. Besidest that in repeater mode you loose 50% of bandwith, in real life it's going to be 70%. That means in ideal environment 54M will be down to 15M. If speed will go down to 11M because of noise and interferrence from other access points you will have just 3M. If you expect to print large documents it's not going to be so nice.
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Author Comment

by:reckon
ID: 20446702
You mean the device you mentioned in your first posting?

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LVL 11

Accepted Solution

by:
tvman_od earned 2000 total points
ID: 20447180
Yeah, something like this. I run a wireless network in almost ideal environment. There is no any neigbors, multiple access points covering entire building. Speed tests indicate maximum possible for G standard. Still, people complain about speed when working with file and print services. I always recommend to use hard cold copper wire whenever it's possible. In most cases it's just a matter to get a ladder and pull a couple of drops to desired place. Two hours total and no problems. The cost will be much less then to purchase bunch of equipment and mess with it later trying to make it work properly.
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