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Isolating one machine from all but one network resource?

Posted on 2007-11-14
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Last Modified: 2010-04-12
I have two subnets at this location,  .60 and .61.  I need to have a server (Windows Server 2k3 Standard R2) located at 60.44 connect to another server at 61.40. They currently communicate perfectly across both subnets- the issue is that the server on 60.44 needs to have all network resource restricted to ONLY communicating with the other server at 61.40. To clarify, the 60.44 server needs to accept an RDP connection, speak with the 61.40 server, and have no other access to the network. Additionally the server at 61.40 needs to retain its full connectivity to all network resources.
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Question by:KinjinZero
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by:svs
ID: 20283845
You could put a firewall between 60.44 and the rest of its subnet.  It could even retain its IP, with some magic (arp proxy).
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pinkisthenewblue earned 500 total points
ID: 20303842
Not sure what versions of Server2003 come with the option of installing this, but try using "routing and remote access" - install it on the server you want to isolate and create rules, not letting it connect to anything except this specific IP (and possibly the router in between if applicable). I did this on an Enterprise edition and worked like a charm.

Alternatively, remove the routes on the server you want to isolate (this doesn't require any install).
cmd prompt:
route print >> (mybackupfile.backup)                              
route delete 0.0.0.0                            
route delete xxx.xxx.60.255
route delete xxx.xxx.61.255 (if applicable)

THEN add the route to your second server. If you have a router in between you'll need to add that route back, if not just this one:

route add xxx.xxx.61.40 mask 255.255.240.0 xxx.xxx.61.40

With router:

route add (routers IP) mask 255.255.240.0 (routers IP)
route add xxx.xxx.61.40 mask 255.255.240.0   (routers IP)

I would recommend both reading up and testing this first, there might be more rules you need to delete and it can potentially do a lot of damage.                          
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